Thursday 15 April

9:00 - 9:30
Introduction
9:30 - 10:30
Workshop in preparation of lecture 1 - Aincre Evans
10:30 - 11:00
Break
11:00 - 12:00
Workshop in preparation of lecture 2 -  Seunghyun Song
12:00 - 13:30
Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00
Public workshop 1 - Aincre Maame-Fosua Evans
15:00 - 15:30
Break
15:30 - 17:00
Public workshop 2 -  Seunghyun Song
17:00
Closing

Workshop 1 - Aincre Maame-Fosua Evans - moderated by Nozizwe Dube
Curriculum and the Colonial Library

The Colonial Library, a concept developed by philosopher Valentin-Yves Mudimbe, refers to the literary canon and epistemological order that constructs the African continent as both ‘other’ and ‘inferior’. The idea of the colonial library allows us to conceptualize and frame the relationship between power and knowledge production in the relationship between the African continent and Euro-America. In order to explore decolonial pathways critically, this workshop will take a closer look at the concept of the colonial library and its far reaching implications for the curriculum. Ideas and examples around colonial fantasy, legacy, and epistemological ethnocentrism will frame our conversations around decoloniality and curriculum. By the end of the workshop participants should be able to grasp the concept of the colonial library and relate it to contemporary calls for decolonization in academia. 

Aincre Maame-Fosua Evans is a Teaching Fellow at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Aincre’s academic and activist work centers on de-colonial and feminist social change with particular attention paid to the African continent and its diaspora in Europe.

Nozizwe Dube is a Law student at KU Leuven, specialising in International and European Law and Public Law. She writes a thesis on the restitution of plundered colonial art and cultural goods from a human rights perspective. She is also a former president of the Flemish Youth Council and was nominated as Young European of 2017 by the Schwarzkopf Foundation. Nozizwe is the coordinator of UNDIVIDED for KU Leuven, a student-led organisation working on the decolonisation of curricula, gender and LGBTQ+ students from an intersectional perspective within the university.  

Workshop 2 - Seunghyun Song - moderated by Baudouin Mena Sebu
To cherish what we speak: Negative language attitudes and structural injustice

This paper argues that negative language attitudes to minority languages are social processes that cause structural injustice.
The paper proceeds as follows. First, based on sociolinguistic literature, I point out that languages come with social values attached. I focus on a specific type of value, namely, language attitudes that are transmitted intergenerationally. An accent, for instance, signals social meanings like the speaker’s social, economic, and educational background. People evaluate and react to these meanings, thereby holding certain language attitudes.
Then, I zoom in on negative language attitudes. I claim that they originate from the history of injustice. I specifically refer to colonization and racial injustices. For instance, an indigenous language may be considered retrograde. Or, an indigenous language may be considered not conducive to social advancement. These negative attitudes, which are clearly detrimental, partly originate from (past) injustices.
​I bridge these sociolinguistic works to the debate of linguistic justice and structural injustice. I argue that negative language attitudes that partly stem from past injustices are examples of unjust social processes that result in structural linguistic injustice, as they reproduce the legacy of historical injustice with objectionable consequences. Following Iris Marion Young, I argue these structural injustices give rise to dignity-based concerns and to claims of structural reform.
Finally, I consider the advantages and disadvantages of recognition (especially, national level of recognition such as recognizing immigrant language as one of many official languages) as a means of successful structural reform.

Seunghyun Song is a PhD fellow at RIPPLE, KU Leuven. She is a member of a project "Migration and Justice" funded by KU Leuven and her research focuses on linguistic in/justice, colonial injustice, and structural injustice. Before coming to Leuven, she worked at the University of Graz in Austria as a member of the "The Supersession Thesis and Historical Injustice" project funded by the Austrian Science Fund. She also worked at the University of Antwerp as a junior researcher before Graz. She received a B.A and M.A. in Philosophy from KU Leuven and an M.A. in Gender and Diversity from Ghent University in Belgium. Her work has appeared in CRISPP, Social Epistemology, and DiGeSt: Journal of Diversity and Gender Studies.

Baudouin Mena Sebu is a PhD student at the Institute of Development Policy (IOB), University of Antwerp, researching the resurgence of customary authority in Haut-Uélé (DR Congo). Baudouin is a guide for the temporary exhibition 100 x Congo, at the Antwerp museum MAS, and hosts a podcast that reflects on the exhibition.

Friday 16 April


9:15 - 9:30
Short introduction
9:30 - 10:30
​Workshop in preparation of lecture 3 - Grâce Ndjako
10:30 - 11:00
Break
11:00 - 12:00
Workshop in preparation of lecture 4 - Rachida Aziz
12:00 - 13:30
Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00
Public workshop 3 - Grâce Ndjako
15:00 - 15:30
Break
15:30 - 17:00
Public workshop 4 - Rachida Aziz
17:00
Closing


Workshop 3 - Grâce Ndjako - moderated by Josias Tembo
Decoloniality in white spaces

In this workshop Grâce Ndjako expands on the very important and urgent questions academics such as Achille Mbembe put forward when they ask: “What are the limits placed on the ‘decolonization’ project by the forces of neoliberalism? And subsequently what happens to this project of decolonization when introduced in spaces that are still marked by colonial structures and by whiteness. By engaging with the works of Mbembe and Sara Ahmed we will explore not just what it is that whiteness does to colonized bodies, but how the coloniality of the treatment of these bodies is reproduced as whiteness engages with the work that is produced by colonized bodies. 

Grâce Ndjako obtained a BA in Political Science at the University of Amsterdam, a MA in philosophy from Paris IV Sorbonne, a MA Philosophy plus a MS in Political Science from UVA. She wrote a master thesis on African philosophy and about the conditions under which authentic African thought can arise. She has worked as a teaching assistant in Non-Western Philosophy at UVA, and organizes masterclasses on African philosophy in cooperation with NiNsee (The National Institute for the Study of Dutch Slavery and its Legacy). Currently she is co-founding ‘Black Renaissance’, a foundation that aims to organize lectures, masterclasses and workshops on African and Afro-Caribbean philosophy. 

Josias Tembo is a PhD researcher and lecturer at the department of Ethics and Political Philosophy at Radboud University in the Netherlands. His PhD research is on the connections between race and religion across the Atlantic. Tembo has a master degree in philosophy from the University of Pretoria in South Africa. He is interested in critical philosophy of race, postcolonial and decolonial theories, African philosophy, and political and social philosophy. He is a member of The Race-Religion Constellation Project: http://racereligionresearch.org

Workshop 4 - Rachida Aziz - moderated by Dounia Bourabain
Nobody will sleep here tonight

Rachida Aziz is a writer, activist, organizer and fashion designer from Brussels. In her book ‘Niemand zal hier slapen vannacht’ (‘Tonight, nobody’s gonna sleep here’) she writes about racism, whiteness, discrimination, feminism and social struggle. The book is both an autobiography and an analysis of our white, patriarchal, racist, capitalist society, and how the voices of the oppressed have been stifled for an eternity.

Dounia Bourabain is a PhD researcher at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. She graduated as an honorary student with the greatest distinction in the master of sociology at the VUB. She also studied migration studies at Erasmus University Rotterdam. She researched ethnic and gender discrimination in clothing stores, for which she was publicly recognized and won several prizes, among others, the P.F. Verhulstprijs and the Acco-thesisprijs. Today, her expertise lies in different fields of inequality.