Research team

Internet Data Lab (IDLab)

Expertise

Ambitious and independent research engineer with 6 years of experience in IT and project management gained in Belgium (IDLab @ UAntwerp-imec), Germany (FIWARE Foundation, TU Berlin) and the US (UC Berkeley). Extensive knowledge of data-centric and context-aware wireless communication, with application to the Internet of Things, 5G, beyond-5G, and Industry 4.0. PhD (Dr.-Ing.) awarded by TU Berlin in November 2017 (magna cum laude).

Scalable Localization-enabled In-body Terahertz Nanonetwork (ScaleITN). 01/06/2020 - 31/05/2022

Abstract

Nanotechnology is paving the way toward nanodevices that will enable several groundbreaking healthcare applications. Nanodevices are expected to flow through the human body, perform actions at certain locations, and communicate monitoring results to the outside world. There is, therefore, a need to enable two-way communication between the nanodevices and the outside world, as well as their localization inside the body. These functionalities should be supported while simultaneously maintaining tiny form factors and a low energy consumption profile of a potentially vast number of nanodevices. In the ScaLeITN project, I will utilize wireless signals in the terahertz (THz) frequencies for enabling both localization and communication capabilities. Localization will be enabled through THz backscattering, which is an unexplored paradigm that promises low energy and high precision nanoscale localization. The constrained communication range characteristic for in-body propagation will be mitigated through multi-hopping, where only a selected subset of nanodevices in the multi-hop route will be awoken. Selection of relays will be based on their location estimates and energy lifecycle characterizations. This is again a novel paradigm that promises enabling low power and scalable nanocommunication. The main outcome is to develop a pioneering prototype of an in-body THz nanonetwork with both localization and two-way communication capabilities.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Repeatable mmWave WiFi Experimentation with Mobility and Obstacles. 01/04/2020 - 31/03/2021

Abstract

The latest generation of WiFi technology, known as mmWave WiFi, utilizes comparatively higher frequencies than traditional WiFi. To combat high signal attenuation at mmWave frequencies, mmWave WiFi utilizes directional transmission and reception of signals. By utilizing directional communication at high frequencies, and in contrast to omni-directional and low-frequency traditional WiFi technologies, mmWave WiFi can deliver tens of gigabits per second bitrates required by various ground-breaking applications (e.g., virtual reality and aerial wireless networks). To establish strong communication links, in mmWave WiFi the directions of transmit and receive beams must be properly aligned, which is a process known as beam-steering. The current beam-steering mechanisms do not perform well under in dynamic conditions, i.e., when the communicating devices are mobile or if there are humans obstructing the communication. Therefore, there is a need for developing new beam-steering mechanisms that will be able to mitigate these negative effects. Consequently, experimental evaluation of these newly developed mechanisms will be required in order to benchmark their performance against the existing ones. To guarantee fair comparative benchmarking, there is a need for highly repeatable experimentation, i.e., different instances of an experiment must be performed in a way that preserves all experimental conditions (apart from exchanging the beam-steering mechanisms), pertaining primarily to the repeatable mobility patterns of the communicating devices, as well as the mobility patterns of humans causing obstacles. Such conditions cannot be achieved if humans are involved in the experimentation, either as carriers of devices or as obstacle generating factor. To alleviate these issues, we will develop a testbed infrastructure for fully repeatable mmWave WiFi experimentation with device mobility and moving obstacles. The repeatability will be guaranteed by utilizing drones as the carriers of mmWave WiFi devices and a combination of a robotic mobility platform and mannequin resembling a moving human-like obstacle. Once developed, this testbed infrastructure will increase the visibility of our university to a large heterogeneous audience and allow as to kick-start our research activities in the highly-promising mmWave WiFi domain. In addition, the testbed will be convenient for a broad range of experimentation with mobile wireless infrastructures going beyond the scope of the initially envisioned beam-steering in mmWave WiFi experimentation.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)