From violent conflict to peace and state reconstruction

Course Code :3011IOBCNF
Study domain:Development Aid
Academic year:2019-2020
Semester:2nd semester
Contact hours:70
Credits:12
Study load (hours):336
Contract restrictions: No contract restriction
Language of instruction:English
Exam period:exam in the 2nd semester
Lecturer(s)Stef Vandeginste
Bert Ingelaere
Kristof Titeca
Ivan Ashaba

3. Course contents *

Course structure:

  • Unit 1: Analysis of violent conflict
  • Unit 2: Peace and post-conflict reconstruction: state-level and international dimensions
  • Unit 3: Peace and post-conflict reconstruction: micro-dynamics and local dimensions
  • Unit 4: End of module paper and presentation

 

Students participate in all of the four units.

Content description per Unit

Unit 1: Analysis of violent conflict

The aim of this Unit is to gain a deeper understanding of the political, social and economic dynamics of contemporary conflicts, with a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa. This Unit presents a state of the art of conflict studies and offers some basic conceptual and methodological insights. Furthermore, root causes, drivers and contemporary dynamics of violent conflict are introduced. The occurrence of violent conflict is related to political, institutional and resource related parameters. A thematic approach is combined with and illustrated through case-studies.

Sessions

  • Session 1: Why is there no war in Belgium? Overview of the module. The lexicon of violent conflict. Conflict analysis methodology. (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 2: Violent conflict in Sub-Sahara Africa: contemporary trends (K. Titeca)
  • Session 3: Causes of conflict: greed or grievance? A critical approach to the debate. (K. Titeca)
  • Session 4: Conflict and natural resources: narratives of conflict. (K. Titeca)
  • Session 5: Conflict, rationality and religion. Case-study on Northern Uganda. The spiritual order of the Lord’s Resistance Army. (K. Titeca)
  • Session 6: Complex emergencies and humanitarian intervention. (K. Titeca)

Unit 2: Peace and post-conflict reconstruction: state-level and international dimensions

This Unit offers insights into the stakes and actors – at national and international level - involved in conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction processes. Against the background of global peace-making theory and practice, a policy oriented understanding is achieved of the tools, strategies and challenges of peace negotiations and post-conflict peace-building. A thematic approach is combined with and illustrated through case-studies. Specific attention is paid to the approaches adopted by states and inter-governmental organisations in three thematic areas: (i) power-sharing, stability and inclusive governance; (ii) democratization, elections and constitutional rule; (iii) transitional justice.

Sessions

  • Session 1 – Liberal peacebuilding: the end of a paradigm? (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 2 – Human rights, causes of conflict and conflict resolution (part I) (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 3 –  Human rights, causes of conflict and conflict resolution (part II) (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 4 – Power-sharing and conflict resolution (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 5 – Power-sharing and inclusive governance (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 6 – Power-sharing: case-study on Burundi (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 7 – Democratization: post-conflict elections (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 8 – Democratization: unconstitutional changes of government, popular uprisings and presidential term limits. (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 9 – Transitional Justice (S. Vandeginste)
  • Session 10 – Globalisation of post-conflict justice (S. Vandeginste)

Unit 3: Peace and post-conflict reconstruction: micro-dynamics and local dimensions

This unit focuses on the localized and/or interpersonal dynamics and processes of conflict resolution, peace-making and reconciliation. Against the theoretical background of the ‘liberal peace-building”-paradigm we situate, explore, examine and analyse alternative approaches that are rooted in and shaped by cultural contexts, custom and the dynamics of everyday life. In doing so, we equally assess so-called hybrid forms and situations when and where liberal and other, global and local meet and interact. A thematic approach is combined with and illustrated through case-studies. 

Sessions

  • Session 1: The liberal peace and its alternatives (B. Ingelaere)
  • Session 2: Global & local peacemakers, (transitional) justice processes and the everyday (B. Ingelaere)
  • Session 3: Customary, indigenous and culturally-sensitive approaches. (B. Ingelaere)
  • Session 4: Hybrid conflict resolution, peace and (transitional) justice. (B. Ingelaere)

Unit 4: End of module paper and presentation

  • Students are expected to work individually on a topic related to the Module, and to write and present a paper of 5000-6000 words (all in).
  • Students are expected to present their papers in a conference format.
  • Students have to critically discuss another student’s paper during the EOMP conference. Role as discussant of paper: A short intervention to evaluate, comment, make critical observations and ask questions about the paper written and presented by a fellow student (5 minutes).
  • All students are expected to attend the EOMP conference.