General Info

As a large international consortium of 26 countries and 110 higher-education institutions (HEIs), we successfully developed and executed an online student survey during or directly after the initial peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 International Student Well-being Study (C19 ISWS) is a cross-sectional multicountry study that collected data on highereducation students during the COVID-19 outbreak in the spring of 2020. The dataset allows description of: (1) living conditions, financial conditions, and academic workload before and during the COVID-19 outbreak; (2) the current level of mental well-being and effects on healthy lifestyles; (3) perceived stressors; (4) resources (e.g., social support and economic capital); (5) knowledge related to COVID-19; and (6) attitudes toward COVID-19 measures implemented by the government and relevant HEI. The dataset additionally includes information about COVID-19 measures taken by the government and HEI that were in place during the period of data collection. The collected data provide a comprehensive and comparative dataset on student well-being. In this article, we present the rationale for this study, the development and content of the survey, the methodology of data collection and sampling, and the limitations of the study. In addition, we highlight the opportunities that the dataset provides for advancing social science research on student well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic in varying policy contexts. Thus far, this is, to our knowledge, the first cross-country student well-being survey during the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in a unique dataset that enables high-priority socially relevant research

More info can be found in our research protocol: https://doi.org/10.1177/1403494820981186

Output

Published research based on the C19 ISWS data can be found here: https://zenodo.org/communities/c19-isws/

 

Media coverage

De Standaard (June 2nd, 2020). Het studentenleven: Minder alcohol, meer zorgen. https://www.standaard.be/cnt/dmf20200601_04977591 

Üsküdar Üniversitesi (June 1, 2020) COVID-19 Uluslararası Öğrenci İyilik Halini Araştırıyoruz! https://uskudar.edu.tr/tr/icerik/5283/covid-19-uluslararasi-ogrenci-iyilik-halini-arastiriyoruz

VAD (Vlaams expertisecentrum Alcohol en andere Drugs) (June 4, 2020) Alcoholgebruik in Vlaanderen tijdens de lockdown, Nieuwsbrief onderzoek 2020 - nr. 7 https://mailchi.mp/78dabc82d934/vad-nieuwsbrief-onderzoek-2019-nr-4048105?e=2dd1d5a201

 

 

Partners

Principle investigators: Prof. Sarah Van de Velde, prof. Edwin Wouters, dr. Veerle Buffel

C19 ISWS consortium:

Last name

First name

University/College

Country

Aertgeerts

Joris

Thomas More

Belgium

Bracke

Piet

Ghent University, Department of Sociology, Health & Demographic Research Group

Belgium

Buffel

Veerle

University of Antwerp, Department of Sociology, Centre for Population, Family and Health

Belgium

Christens

Gert

AP Hogeschool

Belgium

De Backer

An

Hasselt University

Belgium

Gadeyne

Sylvie

Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Interface Demography

Belgium

Goovaerts

Christel

Karel de Grote Hogeschool Antwerpen

Belgium

Joos

Mathilde

Hogeschool Gent

Belgium

Kindermans

Hanne

Hasselt University, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences

Belgium

Nyssen

Anne-Sophie

Université de Liège, Department of Work Psychology, Cognitive Ergonomics

Belgium

Puttaert

Ninon

Université de Liège, Department of Psychology: Cognition and Behavior

Belgium

Ranschaert

Brecht

Erasmus Hogeschool Brussel

Belgium

Smet

Jan

Hogeschool Gent, Erasmus Hogeschool Brussel

Belgium

Somogyi

Nikolett

University of Antwerp, Department of Sociology, Centre for Population, Family and Health

Belgium

Swennen

Quirine

Hasselt University, Biomedical Research Institute

Belgium

Van de Velde

Sarah

University of Antwerp, Department of Sociology, Centre for Population, Family and Health

Belgium

Van Guyse

Marlies

Luca School of Arts

Belgium

Van Hal

Guido

University of Antwerp, Department of Social Medicine

Belgium

Van Steenhuyse

Klaas

University College Leuven Limburg

Belgium

Vandewalle

Marc

University College Leuven Limburg

Belgium

Vanmaercke

Sander

Flemish Student Union

Belgium

Vermeersch

Hans

Vives University of Applied Sciences

Belgium

Vervecken

Dries

Karel de Grote Hogeschool Antwerpen

Belgium

Willems

Barbara

Ghent University, Department of Sociology, Health & Demographic Research Group

Belgium

Withofs

Jan

University College Leuven Limburg

Belgium

Wouters

Edwin

University of Antwerp, Department of Sociology, Centre for Population, Family and Health

Belgium

Bilodeau

Jaunathan

McGill University, Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts

Canada

Blackburn

Marie-Eve

Cégep de Jonquière, ECOBES-Research and Transfer

Canada

Brault

Marie-Christine

Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Département des sciences humaines et sociales

Canada

Fleury

Charles

Université Laval, Département de sociologie

Canada

Quesnel Vallee

Amelie

McGill University, Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts

Canada

Chatzittofis

Andreas

University of Cyprus, Medical School, Shacolas Educational Centre for Clinical Medicine

Cyprus

Constantinidou

Fofi

University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology

Cyprus

Constantinou

Anastasia

University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology

Cyprus

Psaltis

Charis

University of Cyprus, Department of Psychology

Cyprus

Klusacek

Jan

Czech Academy of Sciences, Institute of Sociology

Czechia

Kudrnacova

Michaela

Czech Academy of Sciences, Institute of Sociology

Czechia

Soukup

Petr

Charles University, Institute of Sociological Studies

Czechia

Berg-Beckhoff

Gabriele

University of Southern Denmark, Unit for Health Promotion Research

Denmark

Guldager

Julie Dalgaard

University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Public Health and University College South

Denmark

Jervelund

Signe Smith

University of Copenhagen, Department of Public Health, Section of Health Services Research

Denmark

Stock

Christiane

University of Southern Denmark, Unit for Health Promotion Research

Denmark

Aaltonen

Sanna

University of Eastern Finland, Department of Social Sciences

Finland

Elovainio

Marko J

University of Helsinki, Department of Psychology and Logopedics

Finland

Kemppainen

Kristiina

Finnish Research Foundation for Studies and Education (OTUS)

Finland

Lauronen

Tina

Finnish Research Foundation for Studies and Education (OTUS)

Finland

Murto

Virve

Finnish Research Foundation for Studies and Education (OTUS)

Finland

Paunio

Tiina

University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare; SleepWell Research Program, Psychiatry, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital

Finland

Sarasjärvi

Kiira

University of Helsinki, Tampere University and OTUS

Finland

Vuolanto

Pia

Tampere University, Faculty of Social Sciences, NEGATE Lab

Finland

Ladner

Joel

Rouen University, School of Medicine, Rouen University Hospital

France

Sauger

Nicolas

Sciences Po, Centre d'études européennes

France

Tavolacci

Marie Pierre

Rouen University, School of Medicine, Rouen University Hospital, Centre d'Investigation Clinique de Rouen INSERM 1404

France

Busse

Heide

Leibniz Institutefor Prevention Research and Epidemiology

Germany

Helmer

Stefanie

Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute for Health and Nursing Science

Germany

Mikolajczyk

Rafael

Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute for Medical Epidemiology, Biometrics and Informatics

Germany

Pischke

Claudia

Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Institut fur Medizinische Soziologie

Germany

Stock

Christiane

Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Institute for Health and Nursing Science

Germany

Wendt

Claus

Universität Siegen, Faculty of Arts, Department of Social Sciences

Germany

Zeeb

Hajo

Leibniz Institutefor Prevention Research and Epidemiology

Germany

Mouriki

Aliki

National Centre for Social Research

Greece

Papaliou

Olga

National Centre for Social Research

Greece

Stathopoulou

Theoni

National Centre for Social Research

Greece

Arnold

Petra

Hungarian Academy of Sciences-Corvinus University of Budapest

Hungary

Balog

Iván

University of Szeged, Department of Sociology

Hungary

Balogh

Péter

University of Szeged, Department of Sociology

Hungary

Csizmady

Adrienne

University of Szeged, Department of Sociology

Hungary

Czibere

Ibolya

University of Debrecen

Hungary

Elekes

Zsuzsanna

Institute of Communication and Sociology, Corvinus University of Budapest

Hungary

Lencsés

Gyula

University of Szeged, Department of Sociology

Hungary

Lukacs

Andrea

University of Miskolc, Faculty of Healthcare

Hungary

Vincze

Anikó

University of Szeged, Department of Sociology

Hungary

Bjarnason

Thoroddur

University of Akureyri, Faculty of Social Sciences

Iceland

Oddsson

Guðmundur

University of Akureyri, Faculty of Social Sciences

Iceland

Olafsdottir

Sigrun

University of Iceland, Department of Sociology

Iceland

Keshet

Yael

Western Galilee Academic College, Department of Sociology and Anthropology

Israel

Meler

Tal

Zefat Academic College, Department of behavioral sciences

Israel

Cardano

Mario

Università degli Studi di Torino, Department of Cultures, Politics and Society

Italy

Cosentino

Chiara

University of Parma, Department of Medicine and Surgery

Italy

Sarli

Leopoldo

University of Parma, Department of Medicine and Surgery

Italy

Scavarda

Alice

Università degli Studi di Torino, Department of Cultures, Politics and Society

Italy

Skalicka

Vera

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department. of Psychology

Norway

Van de Wel

Kjetil

Oslo Metropolitan University, Department of Social Work, Child Welfare and Social Policy

Norway

Hilário

Ana Patrícia

Universidade de Lisboa, Instituto de Ciências Sociais

Portugal

Xavier

Beatriz

Nursing School of Coimbra, Health Sciences Research Unit

Portugal

Brumboiu

Maria Irina

Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Epidemiology

Romania

Iaru

Irina

Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Pathophysiology

Romania

Andreenkova

Anna

Institute for Comparative Social Research (CESSI)

Russia

Benka

Jozef

Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, Department of Educational Psychology and Psychology of Health

Slovakia

Gajdosova

Beata

Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, Department of Educational Psychology and Psychology of Health

Slovakia

Hajdukova

Katarina

Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, Faculty of Arts, Dean's office

Slovakia

Orosova

Olga

Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, Department of Educational Psychology and Psychology of Health

Slovakia

Engelbrecht

Michelle

University of the Free State, Centre for Health Systems Research & Development,

South Africa

Knight

Lucia

University of the Western Cape, School of Public Health

South Africa

Steyn

Francois

University of Pretoria, Department of Humanities

South Africa

Van Rensburg

Andre

University of Kwazulu-Natal, Centre for Rural Health

South Africa

Guerrero Mayo

Maria José

Universidad Pablo de Olavide, The Urban Governance Lab

Spain

Mateos Mora

Cristina

Universidad Pablo de Olavide, The Urban Governance Lab

Spain

Navarro Yáñez

Clemente Jesús

Universidad Pablo de Olavide, The Urban Governance Lab

Spain

Rodríguez García

María Jesús

Universidad Pablo de Olavide, The Urban Governance Lab

Spain

Zapata Moya

Angel Ramon

Universidad Pablo de Olavide, The Urban Governance Lab

Spain

Bask

Miia

Uppsala University, Department of Sociology

Sweden

Bradby

Hannah

Uppsala University, Department of Sociology

Sweden

Abel

Thomas

University of Bern, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine

Switzerland

Burton-Jeangros

Claudine

University of Geneva, Institute of Sociological Research

Switzerland

Cullati

Stephane

University of Fribourg, Population Health Laboratory (#PopHealthLab)

Switzerland

Rüegg

René

Bern University of Applied Sciences

Switzerland

Beldhuis

Hans

Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Centre for Information Technology

the Netherlands

de Bock

Geertruida H.

Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Epidemiology

the Netherlands

de Jonge

Jannet

Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences

the Netherlands

Geurts

Sabine A.E.

Radboud University, Behavioural Science Institute

the Netherlands

Jansen

Ellen

Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Department of Teacher Education

the Netherlands

Kappe

Rutger

Hogeschool Inholland, Research Group for Education and Innovation

the Netherlands

Oenema

Anke

Universiteit Maastricht, Department of Health Promotion, Care and Public Health Research Institute

the Netherlands

Super

Sabina

Wageningen University, Health and Society Group

the Netherlands

van der Heijde

Claudia M.

University of Amsterdam, Student Health Services

the Netherlands

Verbakel

Ellen

Radboud University, Department of Sociology

the Netherlands

Vink

Jacqueline M.

Radboud University, Behavioural Science Institute

the Netherlands

Vonk

Peter

University of Amsterdam, Student Health Services

the Netherlands

Wiers

Reinout W.

University of Amsterdam, Department of Psychology & Center for Urban Mental Health,

the Netherlands

Akvardar

Yıldız

Marmara University, School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry

Turkey

Altınoğlu-Dikmeer

İlkiz

Çankırı Karatekin University, Dept of Psychology,

Turkey

Azak

Yakup

Istanbul University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Baytemir

Gülsen

Maltepe University, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences

Turkey

Bulut

Serkut

Marmara University Pendik Training and Research Hospital, Department of Psychiatry,

Turkey

Çoksan

Sami

Middle East Technical University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Eltan

Selen

Ankara University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Erden

Gülsen

Ankara University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Ergül-Topçu

Aysun

Çankırı Karatekin University, Dept of Psychology,

Turkey

Karaca Dinç

Pelin

Ankara University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Kiral Ucar

Gözde

Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Kumpasoğlu

Güler Beril

Ankara University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Merdan-Yıldız

Ezgi Didem

Ankara University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Ogel-Balaban

Hale

Bahcesehir University, Psychology Department

Turkey

Oktay

Seda

Ankara University, Department of Psychology

Turkey

Özdoğru

Asil Ali

Üsküdar University, Dept. of Psychology

Turkey

Ozgur-Polat

Pelin

Kirsehir Ahi Evran University, Dept. of Psychology

Turkey

Sakarya

Sibel

Koc University, Department of Public Health

Turkey

Topcu

Merve

Çankaya University, Department of Psychiatry

Turkey

Yasak

Yeşim

Çankırı Karatekin University, Dept of Psychology,

Turkey

Yorguner

Neşe

Marmara University, School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry

Turkey

Quickfall

Aimee

Bishop Grosseteste University, Department of Primary and Early Years Initial Teacher Education

United Kingdom

Rabiee-khan

Fatemeh

Birmingham City University, Faculty of Health, Education & Life Sciences

United Kingdom

Sahin

Nesrin

Fairleigh Dickinson University, Psychology and Counseling Department

United States of America

Tasso

Anthony

Fairleigh Dickinson University, Psychology and Counseling Department

United States of America

Information translated to French

Informations supplémentaires à mettre sur le site web de VISAJ – au sujet de l’étude COVID international

 

International COVID-19 Student Well-being Study

Étude internationale sur le bien-être des étudiants en temps de COVID-19

 

*For an English version of this document, please visit: https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/research-groups/centre-population-family-health/research2/covid-19-internation/

 

Informations générales

Cette étude collecte des données au sujet du bien-être des étudiants durant la pandémie de COVID-19. Les données sont collectées dans 27 pays européens et nord-américains, en plus de l’Afrique du Sud. Pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires au sujet de l’étude, vous pouvez contacter les chercheures principales du projet international : Sarah Van de Velde sarah.vandevelde@uantwerpen.be ou Veerle Buffel veerle.buffel@uantwerpen.be  professeures à l’Université d’Anvers.

 

Au Québec, chaque établissement participant est représenté par un chercheur principal :

 

Cégep de Jonquière 

Marie-Ève Blackburn, chercheure à ÉCOBES-Recherche et transfert

Marie-EveBlackburn@cegepjonquiere.ca

Université du Québec à Chicoutimi

Marie-Christine Brault, professeure agrégée au département des sciences humaines et sociales

mcbrault@uqac.ca

Université Laval

Charles Fleury, professeur agrégé au département des relations industrielles

charles.fleury@rlt.ulaval.ca

Université McGill

Amélie Quesnel-Vallée, professeure aux départements de sociologie et d’épidémiologie, de biostatistiques et de santé au travail

amelie.quesnelvallee@mcgill.ca

 

Protocole de recherche

La pandémie de COVID-19 a eu un impact significatif sur la santé et le bien-être de la population en général dans tous les pays touchés par la pandémie. Les nations et les systèmes de santé nationaux diffèrent néanmoins de manière significative dans leurs réponses à cette pandémie de COVID-19, au niveau (1) des types de mesures de protection qui ont été mises en œuvre, (2) de la vitesse à laquelle ces mesures ont été mises en œuvre, et (3) de la manière dont la population en général a été informée de ces mesures et / ou sanctionnée en cas de non-respect de ces mesures de protection. Nous savons par la recherche sur les épidémies passées (par exemple, l'épidémie de SRAS) que l'impact sanitaire et social d'une telle épidémie est grave dans la population en général (Brooks et al., 2020).

 

Dans la présente étude, nous avons l'intention de nous concentrer sur l'impact de l'épidémie de COVID-19 sur la population étudiante en enseignement supérieur. À notre grande surprise, seule une poignée d'études a examiné l'impact des épidémies précédentes sur cette sous-population (Wong, Gao et Tam, 2007). Il est néanmoins utile de se concentrer sur cette sous-population, car elle vit les impacts de manière particulière, en étant confrontée à des mesures de niveau universitaire en plus des mesures nationales générales (distanciation sociale, verrouillage, etc.). Par exemple, en Belgique, plusieurs mesures ont été mises en œuvre au niveau des établissements d'enseignement supérieur. Premièrement, la pandémie de COVID-19 a entraîné des changements rapides dans les méthodes d'enseignement: les cours ne sont plus enseignés en présentiel mais sont principalement offerts en ligne, les réunions en face à face entre les enseignants et les étudiants se déroulent principalement en ligne également, et de nombreuses autres des mesures ont été mises en œuvre pour garantir l'éloignement social (par exemple, annulation de stage, interdiction des entretiens qualitatifs en face à face, etc.). De plus, de nombreux étudiants sont rentrés chez eux en raison des restrictions sociales ou vivent actuellement isolés dans leur résidence étudiante. La plupart des étudiants n'avaient pas le droit d'exercer un emploi étudiant rémunéré. En plus de cela, les étudiants ont traversé des périodes d'incertitude, car les mesures prises par leur établissement d'enseignement supérieur ont été mises en œuvre étape par étape (par exemple, comment les examens seront organisés, comment les stages sont finalisés, etc.).

 

Objectifs de recherche

L'équipe de recherche actuelle émet l'hypothèse que les mesures nationales et institutionnelles ont un impact significatif sur le bien-être des étudiants universitaires et collégiaux. Conformément au modèle du stress social (Pearlin, 1989), ainsi qu'au cadre de l'étude «l'impact psychologique d'une quarantaine», récemment publiée dans The Lancet (Brooks et al., 2020), la présente étude vise à identifier le lien entre l'épidémie de COVID-19 et le bien-être des étudiants. Cet objectif général de recherche se traduit par les objectifs de recherche suivants:

 

OR 1: Évaluer comment (1) les conditions de vie (physiques et socioéconomiques) et (2) la charge de travail des étudiants universitaires/collégiaux ont changé durant la pandémie de COVID-19.

 

OR 2: Évaluer comment les changements associés à (1) et (2) sont associées aux niveaux de (3) stress chez les étudiants universitaires/collégiaux durant la pandémie de COVID-19.

 

OR 3: Évaluer comment les changements associés à (1), (2), et (3) sont en lien avec le bien-être, la santé mentale et la santé physique des étudiants universitaires/collégiaux durant la pandémie de COVID-19.

 

OR 4: Évaluer comment les associations décrites en RO3 sont médiées par les stresseurs (peur de l’infection, ennui, frustration, manque d’information, etc.), le soutien social et les connaissances au sujet du COVID-19.

 

OR5: Évaluer la variation du bien-être et de la santé mentale chez les étudiants universitaires/collégiaux entre chacun des établissements postsecondaires et des pays participants.

 

OR6:  Évaluer comment les variations inter-établissements postsecondaires et inter-pays sur le niveau de bien-être et la santé mentale des étudiants universitaires/collégiaux peuvent dépendre des divers (a) niveaux postsecondaires et (2) le contexte et les politiques nationales liées au COVID-19.

 

Qui peut participer?

Vous pouvez participer au sondage Web, si …

Vous êtes un étudiant universitaire ou collégial

Vous êtes âgés de 18 ans ou plus.

 

Quel est le sujet de l’étude ?

Ce sondage comprend des questions sur les changements dans vos conditions de vie, votre santé et votre bien-être suite à la pandémie de COVID-19

 

Pourquoi suis-je invitée à participer à cette étude ?

Par cette étude, nous voulons évaluer comment la pandémie de COVID-19 a eu un impact sur votre bien-être en tant qu’étudiant à l’université et au collège.

 

Combien de temps faut-il pour compléter le questionnaire?

La plupart des étudiant.es ont besoin d'environ 10 minutes pour remplir le questionnaire. Cependant, vous pouvez vous arrêter à tout moment et votre participation est entièrement volontaire. Si vous quittez la page du sondage, vous ne pourrez plus avoir accès à vos données.

 

Pour quelles raisons participerais-je à cette étude?

La crise du COVID-19 a un énorme impact sur la vie universitaire et collégiale. De nombreux étudiant.es pourraient ressentir du stress à cause du COVID-19. La crise a peut-être aussi un impact important sur votre vie (sur l'endroit où vous vivez, sur qui vous pouvez rencontrer concrètement, comment vous pouvez gagner de l'argent, etc.). Cette étude investigue comment ces changements ont pu affecter votre bien-être et votre santé.

 

Les résultats seront utiles pour votre université/collège, car ils pourront lui fournir des informations sur comment organiser de futurs potentiels confinements. Cette étude étant conduite dans de nombreux pays, nous pourrons aussi évaluer les effets des politiques locales/nationales sur le bien-être et la santé de la population étudiante.

 

Quels sont les risques associés à votre participation à cette étude ?

La participation à cette enquête ne comprend pas de risque, et vous pouvez mettre un terme à votre participation à tout moment. Nous vous poserons quelques questions sur des sujets sensibles, comme par exemple votre bien-être et l'utilisation de drogues. Si vous souhaitez parler de ceci avec quelqu'un ou souhaitez plus d'informations, nous vous fournissons des liens vers des ressources en début et en fin de sondage.

 

Comment mes données seront-elles protégées et utilisées?

Le projet a obtenu la certification éthique de chacun des établissements participants. Les informations collectées sont anonymes et ne permettront pas de vous identifier. Nous ne collectons pas les adresses TC/IP et toutes les données issues de la recherche seront conservées sur des serveurs sécurisés. Les données anonymes pourront être partagées avec les partenaires internationaux qui sont impliqués dans cette recherche. L’ensemble de données sera conservé pour la période prévue de cinq ans après la fin du projet. Après la fin de l’étude, toute la documentation pertinente sera conservée conformément à la législation locale et devrait être conservée pendant une période maximale de 10 ans après la fin de l’étude.

 

Quand les résultats de l’étude seront-ils disponibles et où pourrais-je avoir de l’information au sujet des résultats?

 

Les résultats de cette étude seront publiés dans des journaux scientifiques inter(nationaux) et seront présentés lors de congrès scientifiques (inter)nationaux. Un résumé des résultats sera aussi disponible sur le site web de l’étude internationale :

https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/research-groups/centre-population-family-health/research2/covid-19-internation/

 

Collecte de données

La collecte de données s’échelonne entre le 27 avril et le 27 mai 2020 dans les pays participants.

 

Méthodologie

Protocole de Traduction

L'étude internationale COVID-19 sur le bien-être des étudiants s'efforce de parvenir à un principe d'équivalence concernant ses traductions. Le questionnaire de base est traduit par une approche de comité. L'approche du comité implique qu'une équipe d'au moins deux traducteurs travaille ensemble:

 

Ils traduisent l'instrument de manière indépendante.

Ils se réunissent ensuite pour revoir et affiner la ou les traductions initiales.

Ils présentent les traductions lors d'une réunion où une ou plusieurs personnes supplémentaires peuvent statuer sur les désaccords. Cette dernière étape est préférée, mais dans le cas où une troisième personne ne peut être présente, les deux traducteurs se mettent d'accord sur la traduction entre eux.

Avant que les partenaires distribuent le sondage aux étudiants, le sondage aura été testé au préalable sur au moins deux personnes. Cela permet de vérifier si l'instrument d'enquête fonctionne comme prévu d'un point de vue technique, par exemple en termes de techniques de routage et de mesurer la durée de l'entretien.

 

Échantillon

Un sondage en ligne sera utilisé pour recueillir des données auprès de la population étudiante afin de répondre à nos questions de recherche. Chaque chercheur-partenaire est invité à collecter des données au sein de sa propre institution. Les étudiants collégiaux et universitaires (tous les cycles) peuvent être inclus. Les étudiants internationaux / en échange peuvent également être inclus dans l'échantillon. L'échantillonnage des participants via Internet est préférable, car il permet aux gens de participer de manière anonyme et sans effort. De plus, c'est actuellement l'une des seules méthodes possibles de collecte de données en période de quarantaine.

 

Taille de l’échantillon: nous prévoyons un échantillon d’au moins 10% de la population étudante de chacun des établissements participants.

 

Établissements partenaires

Pour une liste complète des partenaires du projet, voir sur le site web de l’étude internationale

https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/research-groups/centre-population-family-health/research2/covid-19-internation/