Research team

Molecular, Cellular and Network Excitability (MCNE)

Expertise

Neuroinformatics, computational modeling en neurophysiology.

CEREBNET - Timing and plasticity in the olivo-cerebellar system. 01/01/2010 - 31/12/2013

Abstract

In this project we will use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate neuronal and circuit functions in the cerebellar network, which plays a critical role in sensori-motor control and is probably also involved in higher cognitive functions. The project will focus on timing and plasticity in the network.

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C7 - Cerebellar-Cortical Control: Cells, Circuits, Computation, and Clinic. 01/11/2009 - 31/10/2013

Abstract

The C7 network brings together leading laboratories in cerebellar research across Europe that span levels from cells through networks to behaviour and clinical applications. The aim is to lay the foundation of a virtual institute for the interdisciplinary study of the cerebellum that will train a new generation of systems neuroscientists in multi-disciplinary work and that will contribute to Europe's leading role in scientific innovation.

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Representation of time in the cerebellum: a computational-experimental approach. 01/01/2008 - 31/12/2011

Abstract

This project investigates the integrative properties of the cerebellum, using classical electro-physiological techniques and the novel application of white-noise stimulation, in combination with biologically realistic modeling. By applying identical stimilus protocols to different neuron types (PCs versus Golgi cells), in different areas of the cerebellar cortex (Crus II versus flocculus) and in different experimental conditions (in vivo versus in vitro, and after pharmacological manipulation of ionic channels and Ca²+ -buffers), we will be able to identify the effectieve stimilu for PCs, the stages at which changes in integration time are generated, and the mechanisms involved.

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Perceptual and cognitive processing in the human and non human primate brain. 01/01/2007 - 31/12/2011

Abstract

This project represents a formal research agreement between UA and on the other hand the Federal Public Service. UA provides the Federal Public Service research results mentioned in the title of the project under the conditions as stipulated in this contract.

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A model study of cerebellar plasticity. 01/10/2006 - 30/09/2008

Abstract

The synapse of a parallel fiber on a Purkinje cell is very plastic. Stimulation of the afferent climbing fiber and the parallel fibers simultaneously or shortly after each other, decreases the strength of the activated parallel fiber synapses. This is called Long Term Depression (LTD) and is the biophysical basis of cerebellar learning. Little is known about the effect of LTD on the firing behavior of Purkinje cells, and because these cells are the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex, it is important to know more about this effect. Classical theories predict a decrease in firing rate of Purkinje cells after the induction of LTD. In a small number of experimental studies in vivo and in vitro the opposite effect was found. A possible explanation of the difference is the fact that these studies look at the Purkinje cell as a simple digital unit, that adds and subtracts its inputs. When a model is made where more realistic physiological properties of a Purkinje cell are taken into account, LTD has a much more complex effect. This model predicts an increase in output due to LTD. This research project will study the effect of LTD on a whole population of cells, using network models. This is different from previous studies where only one Purkinje cell was used in the model.

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A computational inverstigation of the cerebellar Purkinje cell layer. 01/10/2006 - 31/03/2007

Abstract

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Databasing the brain - Workshop. (DB workshop) 01/10/2005 - 31/03/2007

Abstract

New technological opportunities for data sharing have gradually emerged with the introduction of the internet, gradually faster nqtworks, improved database technologies, and affordable massive data storage capabilities. The field of bioinformatics has exploited these opportunities for essential aspects of data sharing. But far from all the relevant gene and molecular level data, from the brain or other systems, are shared in databases today. Moreover, databases are used only sparingly in many subfields of the neurosciences, Hence, there is a potential for more data sharing, re-use of data, and novel analysis based on new combinations of data that can be performed via database systems. The overall objective of the proposed workshop 'Databasing the brain' will be to accelerate existing research and development efforts in the field of neuroscience databasing. Two specific areas have been selected for a detailed study: First, the workshop will focus on standardised data formats and annotations of data at the level of the laboratory work bench. It will explore how the industry (companieiproducing software and equipment for data acquisition, storage, and data management) can help establish data and metadata formats via interactions with the scientific communities. Second, the workshop will focus on the role of journals in providing information about databasing initiatives, in encouraging scientists to share persistent data via databases, and in possibly contributing to novel publishing formats. The workshop will bring together established scientists in the field of brain databasing, expert neuroscientists from many sub-areas of the neurosciences, representatives of SMEs, as well as journal editors and other representatives of journals. A main emphasis will be placed on the dissemination and exploitation of the meeting results, as well as the planning and follow up activities.

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Experimental analysis of cerebellar coding. 01/01/2005 - 31/12/2007

Abstract

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A model study of cerebellar plasticity. 01/10/2004 - 30/09/2006

Abstract

The synapse of a parallel fiber on a Purkinje cell is very plastic. Stimulation of the afferent climbing fiber and the parallel fibers simultaneously or shortly after each other, decreases the strength of the activated parallel fiber synapses. This is called Long Term Depression (LTD) and is the biophysical basis of cerebellar learning. Little is known about the effect of LTD on the firing behavior of Purkinje cells, and because these cells are the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex, it is important to know more about this effect. Classical theories predict a decrease in firing rate of Purkinje cells after the induction of LTD. In a small number of experimental studies in vivo and in vitro the opposite effect was found. A possible explanation of the difference is the fact that these studies look at the Purkinje cell as a simple digital unit, that adds and subtracts its inputs. When a model is made where more realistic physiological properties of a Purkinje cell are taken into account, LTD has a much more complex effect. This model predicts an increase in output due to LTD. This research project will study the effect of LTD on a whole population of cells, using network models. This is different from previous studies where only one Purkinje cell was used in the model.

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Research team(s)

Excitability and connectivity of neural circuits. 01/01/2004 - 31/12/2007

Abstract

This project combines the technical expertise of the 3 research groups to study 3 topics: the cerebellum, enteric nervous system and potassium channels. Specifically we will study: classification of neurons in the granular layer, potassium channels in Purkinje cells and their inhibition of the deep nuclei; expression of potassium channels in viscerosensitive neurons and changes due to inflammatory mediators released by mast cells; and expression and function in the brain of 5 new potassium channel subunits.

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Cerebellar function in relation to cortex : models and experiments. 01/01/2004 - 31/12/2007

Abstract

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Supercomputing cluster. 01/01/2004 - 31/12/2006

Abstract

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Realization of the administrative -logistic component of an international hub function in the research field neuroinformatics. 01/10/2003 - 30/11/2006

Abstract

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A model study of cerebellar plasticity. 01/10/2003 - 30/09/2004

Abstract

The synapse of a parallel fiber on a Purkinje cell is very plastic. Stimulation of the afferent climbing fiber and the parallel fibers simultaneously or shortly after each other, decreases the strength of the activated parallel fiber synapses. This is called Long Term Depression (LTD) and is the biophysical basis of cerebellar learning. Little is known about the effect of LTD on the firing behavior of Purkinje cells, and because these cells are the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex, it is important to know more about this effect. Classical theories predict a decrease in firing rate of Purkinje cells after the induction of LTD. In a small number of experimental studies in vivo and in vitro the opposite effect was found. A possible explanation of the difference is the fact that these studies look at the Purkinje cell as a simple digital unit, that adds and subtracts its inputs. When a model is made where more realistic physiological properties of a Purkinje cell are taken into account, LTD has a much more complex effect. This model predicts an increase in output due to LTD. This research project will study the effect of LTD on a whole population of cells, using network models. This is different from previous studies where only one Purkinje cell was used in the model.

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Spatial gradients in coincidence detection underlying cerebellar long-term synaptic depression. 01/06/2003 - 31/05/2006

Abstract

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Multicompartmental modelling of cerebellar neurons. 08/02/2003 - 07/02/2005

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Use-dependent synaptic and non-synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum. 01/01/2003 - 31/12/2007

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Neuro-IT-Net Thematic network. (NEURO-IT-NET) 01/11/2002 - 31/12/2007

Abstract

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Dynamic sensory processing, learning and visual cognition. 01/01/2002 - 31/12/2006

Abstract

This project investigates cerebellar contributions to cognition and learning with combined electrophysiological and modeling studies in rodents. Normal rats and mice and transgenic animals will be used to study the physiology of cerebellar neurons and their activation during a tactile discrimination task. Functional brain mapping methods will be used in a systematic study of cerebellar activations during visual discrimination in man.

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Experimental analysis of the microcircuitry of cerebellar cortex. 01/01/2002 - 31/12/2004

Abstract

This project is part of our research towards understanding how the cerebellum operates. We use a tight interaction between computer simulation and experiment. In this project we will study the physiology and morphology of large interneurons of the granular layer in vitro and the interaction between Golgi cell and Purkinje cell firing in vivo.

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Computation and plasticity in the cerebellar system : experiments, modeling and database (CEREBELLUM). 01/12/2001 - 30/11/2004

Abstract

The long-term goal of this proposal is to understand how the cerebellum functions. Our approach is based on a tight interaction between computer modeling and experimental work. The work is organized around five scientific questions. Cerebellar connections: what is the relation between in sagitally oriented microzones and the patchy maps of mossy fiber projections? Functional organization of the climbing fiber system: does it strictly follow the sagittal microzones and can inhibition from deep cerebellar nuclei uncouple olivary neurons? What is the physiological role of synaptic plasticity at the mossy fibers to granule cell synapse? What is the function of the glomerulus in the cerebellar granular layer? How does plasticity of parallel fiber synapses affect Purkinje cell firing and what is its relation to motor learning?

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Distributed Databasing of Biological Data. (FWO Vis.Fel. - Robert CANNON) 01/12/2001 - 30/11/2002

Abstract

One of the most serious limitations on the interacton between theoretical, computational and experimental neuroscience is the difficulty of sharing models and data. It is widely accepted that the extensive use of databases is an essential component of any solution to this problem but technical and practical difficulties have hindered their uptake. We will develop and test a novel approach to distributed databasing which is intended to facilitate the publication indexing and searching of biological data. The approach is based on the realization that top-down systems where the "correct" ways to present data are decreed by the database architects are unworkable because of the extreme heterogeneity of the information to be included. Instead, it provides tools allowing those who collect the data to create structures within which to document it. Just enough constraints are imposed on these structures so that their contents remain machine readable and accessible to automatic searching and indexing.

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    Cortical, cerebellar and spinal neuronal networks - Towards an interface of computational and experimental analysis (MICROCIRCUITS). 01/11/2001 - 30/10/2004

    Abstract

    The nervous system is modular - with numerous different networks involved in sensory processing, memory formation and motor coordination. In very few vertebrate cases it has been possible to reach an understanding of a network underlying a given pattern of behavior or function. Here we have selected 5 different microcircuits that we shall try to understand completely. In each case there will be a detailed neurophysiological, morphological and pharmacological analysis in close interaction with a biophysically based computational analysis. The microcircuits are: neo-cortical microcircuitry forming a cortical column; hippocampal microcircuitry underlying gamma oscillations; cerebellar microcircuitry underlying Golgi cell processing; brain stem - spinal cord locomotor networks in lamprey; motoneuron - interneuron interaction in turtle spinal cord.

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    Dynamics of the cerebellar cortex investigated by multi single unit recordings in anesthetised rats. 01/10/2001 - 10/07/2004

    Abstract

    The dynamical behaviour of cerebellar circuits will be studied using simultaneous registration of the activity of multiple identified cells in anesthetised rats. The study will focus on Golgi cells and investigate their correlation dependency on relative position during spontaneous and tactile evoked activity, their response to electrical stimulation of afferent systems and their relation to the firing of other cerebellar units like Purkinje cells and mossy fibers.

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    Computer simulations of cerebellar function 01/01/2001 - 31/12/2003

    Abstract

    The function and operations of the cerebellum remain unclear despite the simplicity and regularity of its anatomical structure. This project aims to use a combination of computer simulation and experiments in man and laboratory animal to improve our understanding of cerebellar function. Computer simulations will investigate calcium dynamics in Purkinje cells and the properties of network models of the cerebellar cortex.

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    Development of a versatile system for advanced neuronal recordings with multisite microelectronics. 01/01/2001 - 30/06/2003

    Abstract

    Our current understanding of how the nervous system functions is based on numerous observations of the behaviour of single units or a small ensemble of units correlated to some external stimulation or behavioural event. However, the processing power of the nervous system lies in its network and interconnections. Thus the key to understanding the nervous system is to make simultaneous observations of the activity of numerous cells. Our objective is to develop such a system and then to make available to the neuroscience research community. It will be based on silicon microelectrode arrays for acquiring signals from nervous tissue in vivo. We will utilise advanced micro structuring to design and fabricate probes with an increasing number of recording sites: 32, 64 or 128 sites placed on tiny fork shaped probes. The role of the UIA is to test the practical usefulness of the system. Therefore we will implant microelectrodes in the cerebellum of anesthetized, and in a later stage also awake, rats and study the correlation in activity between Purkinje and Golgi cells. Furthermore we use develop computer models of the cerebellar network to analyze the data en to validate the compression techniques used in the data recording system.

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    Research team(s)

      A model-based physiological analysis of cerebellar function. 01/10/2000 - 31/03/2007

      Abstract

      Despite the simplicity and regularity of the cerebellar circuitry, its function and operations remain poorly understood. My research group will make a fresh attempt at trying to understand how the cerebellum functions, in close collaboration with experimental groups abroad. We will focus on four research topics: (1) detailed models of calcium dynamics and synaptic integration in the Purkinje cell (2) a realistic neural network model of the cerebellum (3) experimental physiologicy: multi single-unit recordings of the cerebellum in vivo (4) development and distribution of simulation software and technology.

      Researcher(s)

      Research team(s)

      Electrophysiology of cerebellar dynamics 01/05/2000 - 30/04/2002

      Abstract

      The dynamical behaviour of cerebellar circuits will be studied using simultaneous registration of the activity of multiple identified cells in anesthetised rats. The study will focus on Golgi cells and investigate their correlation dependency on relative position during spontaneous and tactile evoked activity, their response to electrical stimulation of afferent systems and their relation to the firing of other cerebellar units like Purkinje cells and mossy fibers.

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        Scientific research community neurosciences 01/01/2000 - 31/12/2009

        Abstract

        Neuroscience includes all experimental and theoretical disciplines studying structure and function of the brain. The complexity of the brain calls for investigation at different levels of integration requiring an interdisciplinary approach. In this international effort we delineate functional networks in human and animal models, study the neuronal operations performed in the networks, model the networks and investigate the molecular basis of their plasticity.

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        Thematic network computational neuroscience and neuroinformatics. 01/01/2000 - 31/12/2003

        Abstract

        A thematic network on computational neuroscience and neuro-informatics in Europe will be created. These are new research areas that are expected to be essential for making progress in understanding brain function during the next century. This thematic network links together several major computational neuroscience and neuro-informatics research centers in Europe. Efforts to promote the growth of a European neuroinformatics community will consist of a fellowship program and a series of specialized workshops. The information collected by the thematic network will be made available on a new web-site.

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        An integrated computer modeling and experimental study of the operations and function of the cerebellum 01/01/2000 - 31/12/2003

        Abstract

        The function and operations of the cerebellum remain unclear despite the simplicity and regularity of its anatomical structure. This project aims to use a combination of computer simulation and experiments in man and laboratory animal to improve our understanding of cerebellar function. Computer simulations will investigate calcium dynamics in Purkinje cells and the properties of network models of the cerebellar cortex. Experimental studies concern the morphology of Golgi neurons, the firing properties of Golgi and Purkinje neurons in awake and anesthetized rats and functional brain imaging of cerebellar activations in man and rat.

        Researcher(s)

        Research team(s)

        Development of a versatile system for advanced neuronal recordings with multisite microelectronics.(VSAMUEL) 01/01/2000 - 30/06/2003

        Abstract

        Our current understanding of how the nervous system functions is based on numerous observations of the behaviour of single units or a small ensemble of units correlated to some external stimulation or behavioural event. However, the processing power of the nervous system lies in its network and interconnections. Thus the key to understanding the nervous system is to make simultaneous observations of the activity of numerous cells. Our objective is to develop such a system and then to make available to the neuroscience research community. It will be based on silicon microelectrode arrays for acquiring signals from nervous tissue in vivo. We will utilise advanced micro structuring to design and fabricate probes with an increasing number of recording sites: 32, 64 or 128 sites placed on tiny fork shaped probes. The role of the UIA is to test the practical usefulness of the system. Therefore we will implant microelectrodes in the cerebellum of anesthetized, and in a later stage also awake, rats and study the correlation in activity between Purkinje and Golgi cells. Furthermore we use develop computer models of the cerebellar network to analyze the data en to validate the compression techniques used in the data recording system.

        Researcher(s)

        Research team(s)

          The role of the olivocerebellar system in the control of motor timing and motor learning 01/12/1999 - 30/11/2002

          Abstract

          We will investigate the role of the olivocerebellar system in the control of motor behaviour by changing single parameters via a genetic approach. We will evaluate two hypotheses of cerebellar function using mutant mice. To avoid the general caveats in the analysis of global knock outs, we will only create and test cell specific, conditional mutant mice. The analysis will focus on two different parts of the cerebellum: I. The role of the vestibulocerebellum (i.e. archicerebellum) in the control of compensatory eye movements, and II. the role of the hemispheres (i.e. neocerebellum) in somatosensory motor integration during whisker movements. Finally, based upon the electrophysiological and behavioural data, models will be made for the network of both the archi- and neocerebellum to evaluate their timing and learning operations.

          Researcher(s)

          Research team(s)

            Dynamics of the cerebellar cortex investigated by multi single unit recordings in anesthetised rats. 01/10/1999 - 30/09/2001

            Abstract

            The dynamical behaviour of cerebellar circuits will be studied using simultaneous registration of the activity of multiple identified cells in anesthetised rats. The study will focus on Golgi cells and investigate their correlation dependency on relative position during spontaneous and tactile evoked activity, their response to electrical stimulation of afferent systems and their relation to the firing of other cerebellar units like Purkinje cells and mossy fibers.

            Researcher(s)

            Research team(s)

              The correlation between neuronal morphology and physiological function. 01/01/1999 - 31/12/2002

              Abstract

              We will study the relation between neuronal morphology and physiological function at several levels of complexity and in two different neuronal systems (the cerebellum and the enteric system). We want to determine the importance of single cell morphology for the classification of different neurons and its effects on second messenger metabolism, on the firing behavior of a particular neuron type, and at the network level. The reconstruction of the neuronal morphologies will be carried out jointly by the two research groups, while the applied physiological research methods are dependent on the neural systems under investigation.

              Researcher(s)

              Research team(s)

                Dynamics of the cerebellar cortex investigated by multi single unit recordings in anesthetised rats 01/10/1998 - 30/09/1999

                Abstract

                The dynamical behaviour of cerebellar circuits will be studied using simultaneous registration of the activity of multiple identified cells in anesthetised rats. The study will focus on Golgi cells and investigate their correlation dependency on relative position during spontaneous and tactile evoked activity, their response to electrical stimulation of afferent systems and their relation to the firing of other cerebellar units like Purkinje cells and mossy fibers.

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                Research team(s)

                  Pavlovian conditioning of neuronal responses in the cerebellum. 01/10/1998 - 25/08/1999

                  Abstract

                  The aim of the proposed project is to find direct neurophysiological evidence for the hypothesis that during the Pavlovian conditioning of behavioral responses a "memory"-trace is formed in the cerebellum. We argue that if neuronal changes in the cerebellum underlie Pavlovian conditioning, these neuronal changes might manifest themselves as a conditioned "neuronal" response at the level of the cerebellar cortex, which can be observed using a chronically implanted, multi-electrode recording system. The first objective of the project is to identify and characterize conditioned neuronal responses in the cerebellar cortex of freely moving rats. The second objective is to test whether the conditioning of these cerebellar responses is, just like the conditioning of behavioral responses, dependent on stimulus contiguity and stimulus saliency.

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                  Research team(s)

                    Information transfer and computation in the cerebellar cortex : an experimental and modeling analysis. 01/09/1998 - 31/01/2001

                    Abstract

                    Through a multidisciplinary approach we wish to investigate how the cerebellar cortex functions. This includes quantitative anatomical methode, intra- and extracellular electrical recordings, voltage and calcium imaging of individual cells and of network activity and computer modeling to study the transforrmation of pontine mossy fiber input into Purkinje cell activity. Major aims are to study mossy fiber inputs onto granule cells, properties of cerebellar interneurons, integration of parallel fiber input by the Purkinje cell dandrite and simulation of the interaction between all these components of the cerebellum. The results will be presented at meetings and in journals, teut also as an on-line neuroinformatics database.

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                    Research team(s)

                      A physiologically and morphologically realistic, large-scale neural network simulation of the cerebellar cortex. 01/01/1998 - 31/12/1998

                      Abstract

                      This project will contribute to our understanding of how the cerebellar cortex transforms mossy fiber input into Purkinje cell output. I will use a combination of detailed compartmental models of the Purkinje cell and a large scale simulation of a realistic neural network. The network model will be based on the known anatomy and physiology of cerebellar circuitry and will be used to examine the integration of parallel fiber input by the Purkinje cell.

                      Researcher(s)

                      • Promotor: De Schutter Erik
                      • Co-promotor: Maes Remy
                      • Co-promotor: Martin Jean-Jacques

                      Research team(s)

                        Neural substrate of categorization of visual stimuli. 01/12/1997 - 10/03/2001

                        Abstract

                        The neural structures responsible for the categorization of visual stimuli, i.e. the classification by object class (e.g. cars, trees), will be studied in humane and monkeys. During initial studies functional brain mapping of the human brain (performed at the Catholic University of Leuven) and clinical studies of patients with cortical and cerebellar lesions (University of Antwerp and Medical University of Szeged, Hungary) are used to determine the activated brain locations in temporal and frontal cortex and possibly in the cerebellum. Subsequently, lesion studies in monkeys will be used to determine the respective contibutiuons of different sites. These results will also be incorporated in a neural network model.

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                        Research team(s)

                          Monte Carlo simulation of diffusion-reaction equations in neurons. 01/10/1997 - 30/09/1999

                          Abstract

                          New efficient simulation methose are needed to compute 3-dimensional diffusion of calcium and other second messengers in the dendrites of neurons. We develop a Green's Function Monte Carlo method within the GENESIS neural simulator. The GFMC method is used to accurately model several uncaging experiments in Purkinje cell dendrites. These simulations provide insights into the mechanisms of buffered diffusion in dendrites and into the properties of calcium release evoked by uncaging of inositol triphosphate in Purkinje cell.

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                            Vision: dynamic processing, plasticity and memory. 01/01/1997 - 31/12/2001

                            Abstract

                            The UIA team will record the activity of tens of neurons in the rat cerebellum and develop methods to analyze this multi-unit data. This study is part of the investigation of cerebellar function by the Laboratory of Theoretical Neurobiology (Prof. E. De Schutter) and complements the development of neural network simulations. The Laboratory of Theoretical Neurobiology will also support the analysis of multi-unit data obtained in monkey visual cortex by the group of Prof. Orban (KUL).

                            Researcher(s)

                            Research team(s)

                              A model-based physiological analysis of cerebellar function. 01/10/1996 - 30/09/2000

                              Abstract

                              Despite the simplicity and regularity of the cerebellar circuitry, its function and operations remain poorly understood. My research group will make a fresh attempt at trying to understand how the cerebellum functions, in close collaboration with experimental groups abroad. We will focus on four research topics: (1) detailed models of calcium dynamics and synaptic integration in the Purkinje cell (2) a realistic neural network model of the cerebellum (3) experimental physiologicy: multi single-unit recordings of the cerebellum in vivo (4) development and distribution of simulation software and technology.

                              Researcher(s)

                              Research team(s)

                                A Large Scale Realistic Network Model of the Cerebellar Cortex. 01/10/1996 - 31/12/1997

                                Abstract

                                This project will contribute to our understanding of how the cerebellar cortex transforms mossy fiber input into Purkinje cell output. I will use a combination of detailed compartmental models of the Purkinje cell and a large scale simulation of a realistic neural network. The network model will be based on the known anatomy and physiology of cerebellar circuitry and will be used to examine the integration of parallel fiber input by the Purkinje cell.

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                                Research team(s)

                                  01/10/1996 - 31/12/1996

                                  Abstract

                                  Researcher(s)

                                  Research team(s)

                                    Evaluation of three-dimentional vestibulo oculer reflex: relevance in specific neurological disorders and in genetic deafness. 01/01/1996 - 31/12/1999

                                    Abstract

                                    Horizontal, vertical and torsional vestibulo-ocular reflexes (3D VOR) are mediated by the central vestibular neurological pathways. With computer video analysis techniques vertical, horizontal and torsional eye movements can be analysed simultaneously and on line in a clinical setting. Norrnative data will be obtained for these reflexes in respons to jaw, role and pitch stimulations. Analysis of this 3-D VOR and correlating them with specific neurological system involvements and genetic deafness will enable to eva luate the additional clinical value of this investigation.

                                    Researcher(s)

                                    Research team(s)

                                      A large scale realistic network model of the cerebellar cortex. 01/01/1996 - 31/12/1999

                                      Abstract

                                      This project will contribute to our understanding of how the cerebellar cortex transform mossy fiber input into Purkinje cell output. I will use a combination of detailed compartmental models of the Purkinje cell and a large scale simulation of a realistic neural network. The network model will be based on the known anatomy and physiology of cerebellar circuitry and will be used to examine the integration of parallel fiber inputs.

                                      Researcher(s)

                                      Research team(s)

                                        A Large Scale Realistic Network Model of the Cerebellar Cortex. 01/01/1996 - 31/12/1997

                                        Abstract

                                        This project will contribute to our understanding of how the cerebellar cortex transforms mossy fiber input into Purkinje cell output. I will use a combination of detailed compartmental models of the Purkinje cell and a large scale simulation of a realistic neural network. The network model will be based on the known anatomy and physiology of cerebellar circuitry and will be used to exam;ne the ;ntegration of parallel fiber input by the Purkinje cell.

                                        Researcher(s)

                                        Research team(s)

                                          Research in the field of Neurosciences. 01/01/1995 - 31/12/1999

                                          Abstract

                                          Neuroscience includes all experimental and theoretical disciplines studying structure and function of the brain. The complexity of the brain calls for investigation at different levels of integration requiring an interdisciplinary approach. In this international effort we investigate three functional principles of brain function : distributed processing, adult plasticity and synaptic integration.

                                          Researcher(s)

                                          Research team(s)

                                            A large scale realistic network model of the cerebellar cortex. 01/01/1995 - 31/12/1996

                                            Abstract

                                            This project will contribute to our understanding of how the cerebellar cortex transform mossy fiber input into Purkinje cell output. I will use a combination of detailed compartmental models of the Purkinje cell and a large scale simulation of a realistic neural network. The network model will be based on the known anatomy and physiology of cerebellar circuitry and will be used to examine the integration of parallel fiber inputs.

                                            Researcher(s)

                                            Research team(s)

                                              A large scale realistic network model of the cerebellar cortex. 01/10/1994 - 31/12/1995

                                              Abstract

                                              This project will contribute to our understanding of how the cerebellar cortex transform mossy fiber input into Purkinje cell output. I will use a combination of detailed compartmental models of the Purkinje cell and a large scale simulation of a realistic neural network. The network model will be based on the known anatomy and physiology of cerebellar circuitry and will be used to examine the integration of parallel fiber inputs.

                                              Researcher(s)

                                              Research team(s)

                                                Model of calcium release from stores in a Purkinje cell. 01/09/1994 - 31/08/1997

                                                Abstract

                                                We will include detailed calcium dynamics in an existing model of a Purkinje cell. Calcium and IP3 induced release from calcium stores will be modeled and investigated.

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                                                Research team(s)

                                                  A large scale realistic network model of the cerebellar cortex. 01/10/1993 - 30/09/1996

                                                  Abstract

                                                  This project will contribute to our understanding of how the cerebellar cortex transforms mossy fiber input Purkinje cell output. I will use a combination of detailed compartmental models of the Purkinje cell and a large scale simulation of a realistic neural network. The network model will be based on the known anatomy and physiology of cerebellar circuitry and will be used to examine the integration of parallel fiber inputs by the Purkinje cell.

                                                  Researcher(s)

                                                  Research team(s)