Research team

Expertise

1. industrial wastewater treatment and reuse 2. (energy-)efficient technologies: sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and aerobic granular sludge (AGS) 3. real-time control of activated sludge systems 4. conventional and innovative nitrogen removal: nitrification/denitrification; nitritation/denitritation 5. biological phosphate removal 6. resource recovery from wastewater and sludge: biopolymers, bioplastics and volatile fatty acids 7. rapid whole effluent ecotoxicity testing

PFAS removal from industrial wastewater 01/11/2022 - 31/10/2024

Abstract

PFAS, poly- or perfluoroalkyl substances, includes thousands of different man-made fluorinated compounds with all kinds of applications, in fire-fighting foams, textiles, building materials, coatings, etc. However, PFAS are also "forever chemicals": persistent, mobile and barely biodegradable. PFAS occur in groundwater and surface water, and a major source of pollution is industrial wastewater. The current technology for removing PFAS from wastewater is activated carbon filtration, where PFAS bind to activated carbon via sorption. In this process no degradation occurs, and the long term efficiency is strongly dependent on the properties of PFAS (e.g. chain length, functional groups...). In the project we want to evaluate and optimize (combinations of) different existing techniques for the removal of PFAS from industrial wastewater, including the cost/benefit analysis and scalability. In addition, we want to gain insight in the behavior of PFAS in industrial (biological) wastewater treatment plants, more specifically how the operation of the biology influences PFAS removal by binding to the activated sludge. The proposed technologies include (electro-) coagulation techniques, various (advanced) chemical oxidation techniques (AOP), electrochemical oxidation (EO), and membrane filtration. We investigate not only the applicability to the effluent, but also to the concentrate stream after membrane filtration in a water reuse scenario.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

AGS-MBR, the continuous-flow, aerobic granular sludge membrane bioreactor for industrial wastewater treatment. 01/11/2022 - 31/10/2024

Abstract

More efficient, compact, and less energy consuming technologies for wastewater treatment are urgently needed to meet the ever stricter discharge norms and to overcome the overall shortage of water, which necessitates water reuse. By combining both membrane bioreactor (MBR) and aerobic granular sludge (AGS) technologies, the main disadvantages of the current conventional activated sludge system (CAS) (e.g. being energy and space intensive and less prone for a compact C/N/P removal or recovery) can be overcome. While the granules can potentially alleviate membrane fouling, the feast-famine conditions and/or other alledged granulation parameters are not straightforwardly transferred to a continuous system with complete sludge retention such as in an MBR. This research aims to achieve and maintain stable granulation of aerobic granular sludge and integrate it with membrane bioreactors in continuous-flow reactors (CFRs). Our central research hypothesis is that the main granulation mechanism, i.e. microbial selection, can be applied to continuous-flow systems. A stepwise approach from sequencing batch to continuous and from continuous to MBR operation, with simple and complex substrates will lead to a final validation with real industrial wastewater. Thorough microbial analysis will gain the required insights to boost the AGS-MBR process to be widely applied in full scale wastewater treatment plants.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Biological phosphorus removal from potato processing industrial wastewater (BioPOM) 01/10/2021 - 30/09/2023

Abstract

The BioPOM project aims at the application of Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) from potato processing industrial wastewater. The EBPR process not only reduces the amount of chemicals needed for phosphorus removal, but also significantly lowers the salinity of the treated water, thus allowing reuse of the treated effluent for irrigation purposes.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Enviromics - Integrated Technologies in EcoSystems 01/01/2021 - 31/12/2026

Abstract

Enviromics is a multidisciplinary consortium of UAntwerpen researchers across the board of environmental sciences and technologies. Through impactful fundamental advances and interdisciplinary approaches across biology, (bio)chemistry and (bio)engineering, the consortium offers bio based solutions to ecosystem challenges by a strong interaction between three pillars (i) Environmental applications and nature based solutions, (ii) Sensing and analysis of chemicals and environments and (iii) Microbial technology and biomaterials, supported by sustainable product development and technology assessment. Through a renewed and tighter focus the ENVIROMICS consortium now signs for a leaner and more dynamic shape. Through intensified collaborations with different stakeholders, both national and international, the leverage for creating enhanced business and societal impact is reinforced. The consortium is strongly managed by a team of two highly profiled researchers partnered by an IOF manager and a project manager with clearly defined tasks and in close contact with the consortium members and the central Valorisation Unit of the university. The consortium has a strong and growing IP position, mainly on environmental/electrochemical sensing and microbial probiotics, two key points of the research and applications program. One spinoff was created in 2017 and two more will be setup in the coming three years. The direct interaction with product developers ensures delivering high TRL products. Next to a growing portfolio of industrial contracts, we create tangible societal impact, when relevant including citizen science approaches. Through the stronger leverage created by the new structure and partnerships we will develop both intertwined branches significantly.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Development of a reversible immobilised cell reactor for the valorisation of dilute phenol waste streams to microbial oil. 01/11/2019 - 31/10/2023

Abstract

Diluted phenol-rich streams occur regularly in lignocellulose-based biorefineries. Today, phenols are often regarded as waste. Some microorganisms can convert phenols into valuable intracellular components by fermentation. This makes the troublesome waste stream a raw material and an economic opportunity. To efficiently concentrate these dilute phenolic streams by conversion to intracellular components, it is necessary to speed up the process. In practice this often happens by increasing the amount of microorganisms, the biocatalyst, and consequently creating high cell concentrations. There is no efficient economic process for integrated fermentation and recovery of intracellular products. Our hypothesis is that the design of a new reactor type, namely a reversible immobilized cell reactor (RIR), offers a possible solution. In this reactor successively adhesion of the cells on a suitable support, fermentation, and finally desorption, to recover the intracellular components occurs. As a case study, the production of microbial oil is investigated starting from the phenolic hydrolysate obtained during the thermochemical treatment of lignocellulose. The aim of this project is to design an economically feasible process for valorising this phenolic flow. The new process will contribute to obtaining a biomass based circular economy.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

BioGRAN: Implementation of the aerobic granular sludge technology for industrial wastewater treatment. 01/10/2021 - 30/09/2022

Abstract

The service platform BioGRAN is situated in the domain of environmental biotechnology, i.e. the biological treatment of industrial wastewater. BioGRAN aims at assisting companies, that treat their own wastewater, in the implementation of the revolutionary aerobic granular sludge technology, leading to significant economic and sustainability advantages. In a first phase, BioGRAN determines the feasibility of granulation with the specific wastewater from a client company. The translation of the key granulation parameters to practical implementation subsequently happens in collaboration with an external partner, the water consultant Cre@Aqua. In this phase, BioGRAN is involved in monitoring of the biological treatment plant during, and after, the implementation of the granular sludge technology.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

First line of water-related advice for industry in the Province of Antwerp 01/09/2021 - 31/08/2022

Abstract

The BioWAVE research group is part of the LED-water network: academics giving first line of advice for companies, in all water-related areas. BioWAVE is the point of contact for companies in the province of Antwerp.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Concepts for an efficient water resource management 01/01/2021 - 31/12/2021

Abstract

In this project we investigate the impact of the aerobic granular sludge (AGS) technology on the membrane filtration characteristics in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating industrial wastewater, on full scale.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

SBR 2.0 01/11/2020 - 30/10/2022

Abstract

BR 2.0 - Optimization of industrial biological wastewater treatment. About one-third of the industrial biological wastewater treatment plants suffer from poor sludge quality, often due to excessive growth of filamentous bacteria. This results in problematic settling, poor sludge dewatering, difficult sludge/water separation and even sludge washout in the effluent. The project aims to apply an innovative strategy to improve the structure, and thus the settling properties, of industrial activated sludge. This is done by acting on the plant's process operation to stimulate favorable groups of bacteria in the sludge, leading to compact sludge flocs. This strategy thus acts on the cause of poor settling! This innovative strategy was applied on a lab scale to improve the quality of activated sludge originating from different companies from various industries. The lab tests were conducted with sludge (1) from the food sector without nutrient removal, (2) from the food sector with nutrient removal, and (3) from the tank cleaning sector with complex wastewaters. The strategy was also applied at full scale in an industrial activated sludge plant. Here the operational strategy was optimized to obtain good and stable sludge quality. In all cases, good sludge quality was obtained, manifested by good sludge sedimentation (SVI < 100 ml/g), good effluent quality, and compact sludge morphology.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

First line of water-related advice for industry in the Province of Antwerp 01/09/2020 - 31/08/2021

Abstract

The BioWAVE research group is part of the LED-water network: academics giving first line of advice for companies, in all water-related areas. BioWAVE is the point of contact for companies in the province of Antwerp.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

DYNASEL – a DYNamic Anaerobic Selector. Development of a tool to monitor the selection of well-settling activated sludge. 01/11/2019 - 31/01/2021

Abstract

The main aim of this proof of concept project is the development of an dynamic algorithm which makes use of simple and reliable sensor signals in order to monitor the anaerobic storage reaction. The motivation of this monitoring tool is to achieve well settling activated sludge (SVI < 100 mL/g) for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Effects of substrate composition on the denitrifying polyphosphate-accumulating microbial community in aerobic granular sludge systems, with specific focus on the nitrous oxide (N2O) formation and reduction dynamics. 01/09/2019 - 31/08/2021

Abstract

Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) is a revolutionary biological wastewater treatment system, with significant advantages in comparison to conventional activated sludge. A very interesting feature of AGS is the potential for simultaneous biological nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal from wastewater. This reaction relies on the specific storage metabolism of denitrifying polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (dPAO). Biological N-removal is however also linked to the formation of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Specifically in AGS, unbalanced denitrification may lead to accumulation of the intermediate N2O, due to the slow consumption of storage polymers by dPAO. The most intensively studied (d)PAO in AGS are Accumulibacter species, but these bacteria have a substrate range limited to the volatile fatty acids (VFA) acetate and propionate. Other putative dPAO using broader substrate ranges have been identified in (conventional) biological wastewater treatment systems, but their role in granulation and N2O formation/reduction dynamics remains unexplored. The main objectives of the current proposal are to investigate (1) the formation of AGS, and (2) the dynamics of P-removal coupled to denitrification and N2O formation/reduction in AGS, in well-defined enrichments of putative dPAO, by applying single and mixed carbon substrates (i.e. VFA, amino acids, glucose). The long-term enrichments are supported by (1) short-term batch experiments to investigate microbial activities, (2) microbial analyses (using quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing analysis) to monitor the taxonomic composition of the enriched microbial communities, and (3) analyses of gene expression of the key denitrification genes. The knowledge gained will (1) increase our insight in the complex reactions in granular systems, offering opportunities (2) to optimize nutrient cycling in AGS reactors, and (3) to define much-needed strategies to limit and mitigate N2O emissions from these innovative wastewater treatment plants

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Contact point for first-line advice in (waste)water related issues 01/09/2019 - 31/08/2020

Abstract

The research group BioGEM acts as the contact point for companies located in the province of Anwerp, for all types of water-related issues. The project involves (1) free advice, (2) small scale tests, (3) formulation of theses, and (4) initiation of larger projects.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

The microbial ecology of industrial activated sludge plants – linking microbial data (e.g. filamentous organisms) to external factors 01/07/2019 - 31/12/2020

Abstract

This projected is situated in the field of biological wastewater treatment and more specifically deals with the activated sludge (AS) process. Filamentous bulking due to the overgrowth of filamentous organisms has been generally reported as one of the most significant downsides of the AS process. In order to provide solutions for (waste)water practitioners, it is crucial to determine the type of these filamentous organisms and link their dominance to external factors. In this project we aim to use next generation sequencing (16s rRNA amplicon sequencing) to analyze the microbial community and more specifically the presence of filamentous organisms of 30 industrial wastewater treatment plants, relevant for the region of Flanders. Subsequently we aim to link the obtained microbial data to external factors such as wastewater, biomass characteristics and the operational parameters of the treatment plant.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Integrated, dynamic and sustainable technologies for the treatment of recalcitrant wastewater streams 01/04/2019 - 31/03/2022

Abstract

Industrial wastewater may contain non-biodegradable organics (recalcitrant COD). In the project, we investigate smart combinations of chemical and biochemical technologies to treat such wastewaters. The project focuses on wastewater from recycling processes.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

New concepts for efficient watermanagement 01/01/2019 - 31/12/2019

Abstract

The project AEROGRAM aims at implementing an innovative wastetwater treatment technology in industry, consisting of the integration of the aerobic granular sludge technology (AGS) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The granular MBR (GMBR) thus combines the advantages of granular sludge (small footprint, dense sludge, simultaneous nutrient removal) and MBR (excellent effluent quality, water reuse).

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Contact point for first-line advice in (waste)water related issues 25/09/2018 - 31/08/2019

Abstract

The research group BioGEM acts as the contact point for companies located in the province of Anwerp, for all types of water-related issues. The project involves (1) free advice, (2) small scale tests, (3) formulation of theses, and (4) initiation of larger projects.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project website

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Living the Granular Life! Microbial ecology of biological phosphorus removal in granular sludge systems. 01/07/2018 - 31/12/2019

Abstract

Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) represents a true revolution in the field of biological wastewater treatment with significant advantages in comparison to conventional activated sludge, such as low energy use, small footprint, process efficiency, recovery of biopolymers & phosphorus...). The granulation process relies on the specific metabolism of carbon-storing bacteria, such as polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAO). The most intensively studied PAOs in AGS are Accumulibacter species, but these bacteria have a very narrow substrate range (i.c. the volatile fatty acids VFA acetate and propionate). Other abundant putative PAOs using broader substrate ranges have been identified in (conventional) biological wastewater treatment systems, but their role in granulation and biopolymer formation remains unexplored. The main objective of the current proposal is to investigate (1) the formation of AGS, and (2) the production of the valuable gel-forming alginate-like extracellular polysaccharides (ALE), in well-defined enrichments of putative PAOs, other than Accumulibacter, by applying carbon substrates other than the VFAs acetate and propionate. Advanced microbial analyses, i.e. quantitative PCR (qPCR) and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing analysis, will be used to monitor taxonomic composition of the microbial community in the sludge during the enrichments. The results of the project will have a significant impact on the development of the aerobic granular sludge technology. The results will help define the application potential of the technology, by pointing out the type of wastewaters that can be treated. Increased knowledge of the key PAOs involved in granulation is also very useful in view of the optimization of the treatment process as it allows tuning the reactor operation in favor of the desired PAO.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

set-up of a lab-scale biological wastewater treatment unit and respirometer 28/06/2018 - 29/06/2019

Abstract

The project involves the set-up of a fully automated labscale biological wastewater treatment unit and respirometer unit for the professional bachelor program in chemistry/biochemistry at the KdG University College.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Continuous granular sludge systems as a compact and sustainable solution for industrial wastewater treatment 01/04/2018 - 31/10/2021

Abstract

The main aim of this innovation mandate is to develop a compact and sustainable granular sludge system allowing the treatment of a continuous flow of variable industrial wastewater. First, a dynamic process control strategy will be developed at lab-scale. Afterwards, this technology/strategy will be examined at pilot-scale, at the location of a potential industrial user. A successful project may lead to the commercialization of an energy-efficient, compact and flexible technology for the treatment of industrial wastewater

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

set-up of a lab-scale bioreactor 06/12/2017 - 31/12/2017

Abstract

The project involves the set-up of a fully automated labscale biological wastewater treatment unit for the professional bachelor program in chemistry/biochemistry at the Karel de Grote (KdG) University College.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Integrated treatment of tank truck cleaning wastewater (INTEAUCLEAN) 01/10/2017 - 30/09/2019

Abstract

Tank truck cleaning (TTC) operations generate a highly complex wastewater. Even after treatment, TTC wastewater may still exhibit a high ecotoxic impact. In this project, we investigate different combinations of chemical and biological oxidation methods to remove residual ecotoxicity from TTC wastewater.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Aerobic granular biofilm formation by Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a in a sequencing batch reactor 01/07/2017 - 31/12/2018

Abstract

Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) is an innovative development in biological wastewater treatment. However, AGS systems are very complex, and to be able to further exploit the potential of AGS, more insight is needed into the different factors governing their formation, maintenance, and composition. The goal of this project is to gain more insight into the properties and composition of aerobic granules, and into the mechanism of their formation. To this end, we will explore the feasibility of obtaining aerobic granular biofilms with a pure microbial culture of Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a or with a mixed microbial culture, starting from a pure-culture inoculum.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Nitrous oxide (N2O) formation in innovative aerobic granular sludge systems. 01/04/2017 - 31/03/2018

Abstract

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas, having a 300-fold stronger effect than carbon dioxide. N2O emissions are associated with nitrogen-removal processes in biological wastewater treatment, and contribute significantly to the total carbon footprint of a treatment plant. Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) is an innovative biological treatment technology leading to significant energy savings in the water treatment process. Knowledge on N2O emissions from these innovative AGS systems is however missing. The objective of the project is therefore the quantification of N2O formation in well-defined AGS systems.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Smart Granules - Dynamic control of nutrient removal in small-scale industrial aerobic granular sludge systems. 01/01/2017 - 31/12/2020

Abstract

Aerobic granular sludge (AGS) represents a revolutionary new biological treatment system based on the formation of very dense microbial aggregates. The current research proposal aims at developing an applicable dynamic control strategy for industrial AGS reactors, based on the signals of common, low-cost and robust sensors. A five step approach will be followed to reach this objective, starting from the development of a control strategy for "simple" well-defined AGS systems on laboratory scale to pilot-scale evaluation of an optimized control algorithm with real variable industrial wastewater.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

INTELSENS - Intelligent integration of online sensors in industrial wastewater treatment plants 01/10/2016 - 30/09/2018

Abstract

The TNAV project aims at promoting the integration online sensors in the operation of industrial wastewater treatment plants. The implementation of online sensors significantly reduces the energy demand of the installation, and the use of chemicals.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

integration of aerobic granular sludge and membrane technology in a sustainable water reuse concept 01/01/2016 - 31/12/2019

Abstract

The project is a cooperation between Pantarein Water and the the research group BioGEM. The main objective is the development of an innovative water reuse concept that integrates the advantages of aerobic granular sludge (fast settling dense and highly active sludge granules) and membrane processes (water reuse potential). The research hypothesis is that the application of aerobic granular sludge in membrane bioreactors significantly lowers the rate of membrane fouling.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Novel substrates and triggers for the production of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) by Pseudozyma aphidis 01/01/2016 - 31/12/2019

Abstract

Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are one of the most promising biosurfactants (BS) because of their many potential applications. Despite all the advantages, BS and MELs in particular, are merely fermented on a limited scale. The main reasons for this are: (1) a limitation in structural variation of naturally occurring BS and (2) the cost, which is often not competitive with that of the chemically synthesized surfactants. The high cost is to a large extent determined by the cost of the feedstock. MELs are currently produced from soybean oil, a valuable substrate that increases the load on fertile land use. A possible alternative to vegetable oil could be oil from oleaginous yeasts. For several of these yeasts it has been shown that they are able to produce oil from volatile fatty acids, a very inexpensive substrate which can be obtained through acidogenesis of wastewater, an abundant waste stream. The objective of this project can be comprised in the research components below, each responding to a limiting factor of MEL-production: - Cost of the substrate: The development and optimization of a multi-stage production system where MELs are produced from oil fermented by the oleaginous yeast Cryptococcus curvatus. For the production of oil by C. curvatus, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and / or glycerol will be used as feedstock. Finally, we designed a case study to obtain VFA from industrial wastewater. - Limited structural variation: In order to obtain a structural variety of MEL-derivatives, alternative feeding of fatty acids and derivatives, such as hydroxylated and bifunctional fatty acids, are fed instead of (vegetable) oil. Hereby we will identify what the most promising varieties are, and their production will be optimized. - Limitations in fermentation yield: Elucidation of the trigger effect of a hydrophobic carbon source in MEL production by Pseudozyma aphidis. To achieve this, the expression of MEL biosynthesis genes will be analyzed under various conditions, with the aid of RT-qPCR. This is also a support towards the other research components. For the production of MELs and oil, fermentation technology is used. Analyses will be carried out with the aid of chromatography. The conversion of industrial wastewater to VFA is done by means of acidogenesis in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). For exploring the trigger effect of a hydrophobic carbon source on MEL production by P. aphidis, an RT-qPCR assay is first developed. This project forms a bridge between different areas of research within the research group Bio-Chemical Green Engineering & Materials (BioGEM) at the Faculty of Applied Engineering (FTI). These are water technology, industrial biotechnology and green and renewable materials.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Biopolymer recovery from wastewater by aerobic granular sludge 01/07/2015 - 31/12/2016

Abstract

Aerobic granular sludge represents a revolutionary new biological treatment system based on the formation of very dense microbial aggregates. An interesting feature of the granules is the high content of alginates, which are extracellular biopolymers with valuable applications. The aims of the current project are (1) the maximization of the alginate yield, and (2) the optimization of the polymer extraction procedure.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Pilot-scale demonstration of innovative nitrogen-removal from slaughterhouse wastewater 01/01/2015 - 31/12/2015

Abstract

The project involves the pilot-scale demonstration of innovative nitrogen removal from slaughterhouse wastewater by nitritation/denitritation in a conventional activated sludge plant. A shortcut in de nitrogen cycle via nitrite (in stead of nitrate) reduces aeration requirements by 25% (for nitrification) and COD demand by 40% (for denitrification).

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project website

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Nutrient removal of industrial wastewater through simultaneous nitritation - denitritation by using granular sludge. 01/01/2014 - 31/12/2017

Abstract

The aim of this research project is to achieve and hold a stable and profound (>80% via nitrite) nitritation in granular sludge. Trough combine this two technologies, significant advantages in terms of energy – efficiency (saving 25% O2, 40% COD and settle times) and land use (saving till 75%) can be obtained. The harmonization of the factors that benefits on one hand the granulation and on the other the nitritation will be the main challenge of this research.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project website

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

INCA - Innovative nitrogen removal in conventional active sludge systems. 01/10/2013 - 30/09/2014

Abstract

The global aim of the project is to determine the optimal control strategy to achieve a stable and significant degree of partial nitrification/denitrification in conventional activated sludge systems. The application of this technology results in some major advantages in terms of energy and process efficiency: 25% less oxygen needed during nitrificatio, 40% less COD required for denitrification...

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project website

Project type(s)

  • Research Project

Removal of endocrine disrupting compounds from industrial wastewater. 01/01/2013 - 31/12/2014

Abstract

There is a growing concern about the presence of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in surface waters, caused by discharges from wastewater treatment plants. The current project aims at the optimisation of both conventional and advanced treatment technologies to remove EDCs from industrial wastewater. Treatment efficiencies will be determined by effect directed analysis using bioassays that actually measure the endocrine disrupting effects in the samples.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

    Project type(s)

    • Research Project

    Ecotoxicity removal from industrial wastewater: optimization of the PACT process. 01/01/2011 - 31/12/2012

    Abstract

    The PACT process is an advanced waste water treatment technology where powdered activated carbon is added to the activated sludge (1) to protect the treatment process, and (2) to obtain an effluent with an improved chemical quality. In view of the more stringent industrial discharge limits that also include ecological criteria, the current project aims at optimizing the PACT process to obtain effluents with a good biological quality.

    Researcher(s)

    Research team(s)

      Project website

      Project type(s)

      • Research Project

      Process control of batch and continious flow wastewater treatment processes for nutrient and carbon removal by the use of respirometry and fuzzy logic control strategies. 01/01/2010 - 31/12/2011

      Abstract

      In this project a process control strategy for batch and continuous flow active sludge wastewater treatment systems will be developed. The control strategy, based on fuzzy logic and characterisation by a newly developed respirometry based device, will allow significant economical as well as ecological advantages. The project also contains an important valorisation part, which will result in an applicable process control strategy.

      Researcher(s)

      Research team(s)

        Project type(s)

        • Research Project

        Implementation of fast bioassays in industrial waste water treatment and WET (Whole Effluent Toxicity Testing) - Validation of the selected assays in view of the EU Water Framework Directive. 01/01/2009 - 31/12/2010

        Abstract

        The water frame work directive, the new European legislation for water management requires the water quality to fulfill some strict chemical and biological criteria. The duration of classical bioassays is too long and incompatible with the dynamics of a water treatment plant. There is therefore a high need for fast and sensitive bioassays. In this project some fast assays will be validated for the usefulness in waste water treatment applications.

        Researcher(s)

        Research team(s)

          Project type(s)

          • Research Project