Research team

Economics

Expertise

My research is in the field of applied (both micro and macro) econometrics and labour economics, with a focus on education, crime, health, gender, and the position of different groups in the labour market, such as: (1) Youth at risk of crime, unemployment, and teen pregnancy; (2) Labour market position of women – gender pay and pension gaps, career progression and glass ceiling, discrimination; (3) Inequality and intergenerational mobility – equalisation of educational attainment of those from different socioeconomic backgrounds as an important tool for improving the equality of opportunity in society; (4) Economic and pro-social behaviour within organisations (social businesses) and returns to entrepreneurship; and (5) Financial services, social networks and financial practices in developing countries. My research tackles problems of modern societies and has high economic and societal impact. For example, the article The Crime Reducing Effect of Education, published in the Economic Journal (EJ) in 2011 established a causal link between education and crime by looking at the crime rates of school-leavers that were forced to stay on an extra year in British schools because of a legal change to the school-leaving age. This group of students was less likely to engage in criminal behaviour than the previous year cohort. The paper estimates that the cost of a year’s extra schooling is outweighed by the benefits in terms of less crime.

Gender pension gap in Europe: Determinants and perspectives for the future. 01/01/2021 - 31/12/2024

Abstract

Despite the abundance of research on the gender wage gap, there is relatively little research on the extent to which women's lower lifetime labour market outcomes translate into lower pension outcomes, taking cross-country perspective. This becomes even more relevant having in mind an ageing population, the falling ratio of the number of people of working age for every person of pensionable age, and the rising proportion of single-person households in Europe. This research aims to: (a) estimate the gender differentials in pension coverage/income in Europe based on the most recent available data, taking into account the life-course perspective, demographic and economic factors, household roles and preferences, and individual country heterogeneity; (b) answer the question whether there is a trade-off between the wages and occupational pensions and whether this differs by gender; (c) quantify the gender differences in the discount rate, i.e., the extent to which men and women differ in terms of valuing the present over the future; and (d) answer what is the role of the family members (partner, children) in securing women's old-age income. The findings will extend the theoretical knowledge in pension economics, indicate whether the current retirement systems in Europe are able to provide adequate pensions and offer insurance against an unexpectedly long life for both men and women, and shed light on policy challenges when trying to narrow the gender gap in old-age income.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Scientific Chair International Francqui Professor 2019-2020 (Prof. Siem Jan Koopman). 01/10/2019 - 30/09/2020

Abstract

Professor Koopman will give the following lectures within the Scientific Chair International Francqui Professor 2019-2020: 1. The Econometrics of Time-Varying Parameters 2. Macroeconomic forecasting 3. Stochastic Volatility Modelling 4. Dynamic Factor Models

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

The effect of Brexit on hate crime and migration in the United Kingdom. 01/04/2019 - 30/03/2020

Abstract

This project will provide causal evidence on the impact of Britain's vote to leave the European Union on changes in hate crime and migration patterns. Using an array of robust econometric techniques, we will consider these changes for the UK as a whole and its regions and investigate whether the effects are temporary or long lasting. Further analysis of other influential factors such as media and social media activity, labour market and socio-economic characteristics of the locality, ethnic and national diversity of the area will complement the main results.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Concerted research program in health economics at Kinshasa School of Public Health. 01/01/2018 - 31/12/2020

Abstract

DRC lacks necessary resources to provide efficient and equitable health services. Reinforcing local capacity is essential to constructively evaluate all health-care financing alternatives, to demonstrate the economic burden of health-related conditions, and to meaningfully determine the value of proposed programs and interventions, appropriate within the Congolese context. To provide efficient and equitable health services for improving the health of the Congolese population, the present project aims to: (1) set-up a concerted research program in health economics (HE) at the Kinshasa School of Public Health (KSPH); (2) strengthen the research capacities in HE at KSPH; and (3) increase the visibility and outreach of research activities and outputs in HE.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Chair in Migration, Integration and Labour Markets with specific focus on labour market position of women and effectiveness of (labour market) integration programmes targeting recent migrants. 20/12/2016 - 30/09/2019

Abstract

The chair on Migration, Integration and Labour Markets is a colloborative research project with the Flemish government on the labour market position of individuals with a migration background in Flanders, with specific focus on the labour on the labour market position of migrant women and the effectiveness of (labour market) integration trajectories targeting recent migrants. The project is innovative in that aims to integrate register data on i) integration trajectories, ii) education and activation trajectories and iii) work permits with longitudinal microdata drawn from the Crossroads Bank for Social Security to reconstruct and analyse labour market trajectories of resident and new migrants using advanced hazard and econometric models. Throughout the project interviews and focus groups are set up with both participants and counselors to bring additional insight to the longitudinal analysis of trajectories based on register data.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Ethnic Composition as a Factor Explaining Public Policy in Developing Countries 01/04/2016 - 31/03/2017

Abstract

The aim of this project is to examine whether fractionalisation and partitioning, two measures of ethnic composition, can explain the quality of public policies observed in developing countries. The project re-estimates the findings of the seminal paper by Easterly and Levine (1997), extends the data with observations from the past two decades, and tests robustness to different measures of policy quality.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Financial services, social networks and financial practices: investigation use and impact research. 01/10/2014 - 30/06/2015

Abstract

This project represents a formal research agreement between UA and on the other hand the client. UA provides the client research results mentioned in the title of the project under the conditions as stipulated in this contract.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)