Rogier van Kooten

Buitenlands doctoraatsbursaal

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Over Rogier van Kooten

2016 - : PhD researcher GIStorical Antwerp-project

In their 2014 History Manifesto Guldi and Armitage provide a passionate argument for the huge societal relevance of historical data and long-term analysis, when combining new digital ways of data-analysis with in-depth historical contextualization of these data. This is precisely what GIStorical Antwerp II aims to do: creating a spatial digital infrastructure, which not only integrates a large amount of historical data informing us on the urban past, but also allows a rapid social contextualization of data by using a Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The PhD project will both contribute to the realization of GIStorical Antwerp II and serve as a test case of the new infrastructure. I will work closely together with dr. Iason Jongepier and Mrs. Ellen Janssens.

Realizing GIStorical Antwerp II requires the following steps: 

1. The geographical reach of GIStorical Antwerp will be extended with the suburban area. 

2. For eight periods in time - starting 1584 - a high resolution social map is created. 

3. For each of the eight sample periods advanced, social indicators (ownership, wealth, profession, inhabitants, family composition) are processed in a relational database. 

4. The topographic authority will be extended. This is a dataset geo-locating and integrating consecutive systems of street names, house numbers and cadastral numbers. 

5. Additional geo data will be incorporated. These are pre-existing social datasets: probate inventories 16th-19th century, foreigners' files, newspapers 1891-1920 and environmental permits. 

Testing GIStorical Antwerp II: A social-spatial analysis of the negotiations by Antwerp inhabitants about environmental conditions experienced in the city centre and the urban fringe 1585 - 1800 

In order to test the GISTorical Antwerp II infrastructure, I will develop a socio-spatial approach of the environmental complaints and conflicts of Antwerps inhabitants both within and outside the city walls. The realization of GIStorical Antwerp II creates the opportunity to examine these negotiations from a spatial angle and against the background of profound economic and demographic developments between 1585-1800.

 

Supervisors: 

Professor dr. T. Soens, Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, Departement Geschiedenis (Centrum voor Stadsgeschiedenis) 

Professor dr. B. Blondé, Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, Departement Geschiedenis (Centrum voor Stadsgeschiedenis)

 

2015 - 2016: MA History

“Like a child in their debt, and consequently their slave”? Power structures in the commercial circuits of a colonial agro-system near New York around 1675

This thesis explores the commercial circuits and networks in the interior regions of New Netherland, where seventeenth century colonial settlers exchanged goods and services. Research in the Low Countries has shown that in rural areas, factors such as land tenure, distribution of landownership, company structure and ecology influenced which products and services were traded and who dominated the commercial circuits. Large farmers in some parts of Flanders for example, acted as powerful intermediaries (production pedlars) between the small local peasants and city merchants by exchanging the use of capital goods like ploughs and horses for labor.

    However, the situation in the North American colony of New Netherland was very different. The findings showed that the combination of the ample availability of land and the small population size had led to a situation where almost three-quarters of rural households owned more than enough land, livestock and horses to be self-sufficient. Transactions in labor and capital therefore played only a minor role. Exchanging agricultural and non-agricultural imported goods with merchants in the urban circuit, by contrast, justified an intermediary role. Especially to serve rural households who lacked enough land or were active in non-agricultural professions. And, while contemporary sources speak of the fear for the dominance of the merchants in setting prices for agricultural goods, the findings show that rural players actually may have operated quiet autonomously and were able to set prices independently of market price volatility.

 

Supervisor:

dr. R. Vermoesen

 

1997-2016: Career in IT projectmanagement and consultancy

1991- 1997: MSc Social Sciences

Tilburg University, the Netherlands

Statuut & functies

Bijzonder academisch personeel
  • buitenlands doctoraatsbursaal

Contact

Stadscampus
Rodestraat 14
S.R-A.112
2000 Antwerpen
Belgiƫ
rogier.vankooten@uantwerpen.be