Research team

Didactica

Expertise

Pre- and post measurements, quantitative data analysis, literature review, in depth interviews, focus groups, Delphi study

Lesson study as a vehicle for improving achievement in mathematics (LESSAM). 01/09/2020 - 31/08/2023

Abstract

The international research project aims to investigate the impact of the model of Lesson Study on teacher learning and, consequently, on student learning outcomes across four participating countries. Lesson Study (LS) is a teacher professional development model that originated in Japan in the 1870s, but has recently been adapted worldwide. The basic model involves teams of teachers within a school investigating collaboratively the effectiveness of teaching practices for their students. The core model involves: a) plan lessons during planning meetings, b) teach/observe those lessons; c) reflect on lessons during reflection meetings. Variations of the model include the presence of a LS facilitator during teachers' planning and reflection meetings, guiding teachers as they construct new knowledge. Despite the promising nature of LS, more evidence is needed in order to establish how teacher learning occurs during LS meetings. Even less evidence exists on the impact of this learning on teaching practices and, as a result, on students' academic achievement. Using a quasi-experimental research design, we examine the impact of a series of Lesson Study interventions in mathematics classrooms (grade 7-9) in four participating countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, Cyprus an Greece). on both student and teacher level. The objectives of the project are (1) to examine the effects of teachers' participation in Lesson Study on their own learning and on students' mathematical reasoning; (2) to examine the potential impact of the role of an LS Advisor and LS Facilitators on dialogues and teacher learning; and (3) to examine the relationship between teacher intentions and teaching practices.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

It takes two to teach! The effects of team teaching models on experiences, learning patterns and learning outcomes in student teachers during field experiences. 01/05/2020 - 30/04/2024

Abstract

Within teacher education, field experiences are crucial in training future teachers. During these internships, student teachers are typically placed individually with a mentor. Since collaboration in schools gains importance (e.g. collegial visitation, co-teaching, learning communities), teacher education institutes show a growing interest in field experiences inspired by collaborative learning. Collaboration between student teachers has several benefits (e.g. enhanced communication skills). Therefore, a paired placement, during which two student teachers share a mentor, is suggested to be a good alternative for an individual placement. During paired placements, opportunities for team teaching, which refers to two or more teachers in some level of collaboration in the planning, delivery, and/or evaluation of a course, arise. Different team teaching models exist (e.g. assistant teaching, equal status model). However, research comparing these models is limited. Therefore, this project investigates how the actors involved in team teaching (student teachers, mentors, teacher educators) experience different team teaching models. Moreover, it examines the effects of these models on student teachers' learning patterns and learning outcomes. In this way, the proposed research contributes to theory development on (dis)advantages of different team teaching models and to a comprehensive understanding of student teachers' learning in paired placements.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Using semi-automated feedback and assessment for mathematical proficiency: a quasi-experimental study on student learning effectiveness, reliability and time savings. 01/11/2019 - 31/10/2023

Abstract

Feedback is the most powerful engine of any learning process. In the field of Mathematics Education, the possibilities to assess automatedly are therefore being thoroughly explored. However, students face difficulties expressing themselves mathematically on a computer and learning systems can often only assess the outcome and not the solving method. Research indicates that automated tests focus too much on procedural fluency, at the expense of mathematical thinking questions. It takes much effort to develop digital tests and teachers are sceptical of using automated assessments, meaning that paper-and-pencil tests still dominate the math class. One of the characteristics of mathematical assessment is that wrong answers tend to exhibit patterns among the student population. Consequently, teachers often repeat their feedback and marks. This brings us to the idea of semi-automated feedback and assessment: by correcting handwritten tasks digitally, feedback can be saved and re-used. This could lead to more elaborate feedback and interesting time savings, but also opens up possibilities to extensively monitor the individual learning process of students, and to apply adaptive differentiated instruction using Bayesian networks. A Bayesian network is a probabilistic graphical model of a student's proficiency. We want to focus on the learning gains that semi-automated evaluation systems can offer, but also explore the reliability, time savings and acceptance levels of such systems.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Identification and analysis of practices of effective use and development of teachers' skills in the last years of primary education 01/10/2015 - 31/03/2017

Abstract

This research project will record good practices of teacher deployment - both in and outside class in upper primary education - that aim at capitalizing on staff competencies, reinforcing differentiated instruction and safeguarding successful transition to secondary education. We will provide in-depth descriptions of selected practices, while at the same time shedding light on accompanying conditions and experiences from the viewpoint of school management, teachers as well as students. Data will be collected through case studies and Delphi methodology.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)