Research team

Condensed Matter Theory

Expertise

High-performance computations for material physics problems (in the past applied to superconducting, magnetic, metal-semiconductor hybrid materials, as well as soft-hard matter hybrids, e.g. large biomolecules with metallic ions/atoms/nanoparticles). Description of quantum effects in atomically-engineered functional materials for specific electronic, magnetic, and/or optical performance. Design, engineering and characterization of electronic devices based on new functional materials.

Shapeable 2D magnetoelectronics by design (ShapeME). 01/01/2022 - 31/12/2025

Abstract

Novel materials that couple advanced magnetic and electronic properties are paramount to sustain the hunger of the modern society for advanced consumer electronics and Internet of Things, yet reduce the energy consumption and environmental impact. To satisfy the rather versatile needs of wearable, flexible, integrable, bio-compatible, ever smarter, and low power electronics, the paradigm shift is needed - towards tailored heterostructures, where different functionalities of the constituents are strongly coupled into a multifunctional hybrid. However, such strong interaction between different materials is challenging to realize, as much as their heterostructures are difficult to grow with sufficient control and quality. In this project, we will pursue the stacks of atomically-thin 2D materials as the most versatile yet fully controllable path towards shapeable magnetoelectronics by design. With properties broadly tunable by external mechanical, electric and magnetic stimuli, 2D materials are crystalline systems that nearly ideally connect the simulation environment to their practical behavior and measured quantities. To understand the deeply quantum phenomena behind the flexo-magnetoelectric coupling in 2D heterostructures, yet bridge them over to observables of practical value at micrometer scale, we formed a consortium of leading Belgian teams for suited multiscale simulations, the pioneer of 2D materials in UK for experimental validation, and imec as technology outlet.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Chirality by design in magnetic 2D materials 01/11/2021 - 31/10/2023

Abstract

Further technological advance of our modern society will critically depend on novel, all-in-one materials, able to couple magnetic, elastic, and electronic degrees of freedom in a controllable fashion. Atomically-thin 2D materials may be just what is needed, exhibiting a range of advanced properties, tunable by stretching, bending, gating, and/or heterostructuring. With advent of magnetism in 2D materials (only since 2017), tailoring their multifunctional behavior is at its prime potential. Magnetism in 2D materials is quite special, since any incurred symmetry change (with e.g. bending) affects magnetic interactions and causes adjacent magnetic moments to misalign, owing to strong emergent chirality, comparable to usual aligning interactions. Chiral interactions lead to observable nontrivial magnetic textures, such as skyrmions, and cause entirely different behavior of dynamic excitations (magnons), both of which bear documented technological promise. Symmetry breaking that causes chirality is also accompanied by local electric field, so that chiral magnetism and electric polarization in a 2D material are effectively coupled. This project is devoted to understanding of that coupling, and its response to standard manipulations within the realm of 2D materials, that will enable tailoring of chiral magneto-electronics practically at will, for actively and broadly tunable technology very sensitive to electric, magnetic, optical or mechanical stimuli.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Piezo and flexoelectricity driven by inhomogeneous strain in 2D materials. 01/10/2020 - 30/09/2023

Abstract

Electromechanical properties play an essential role in determining the physics of dielectric solids and their practical application. Popularly, electrostriction, and the piezoelectric effect were considered to be the two main electromechanical effects that couple an applied electric field to the strain and vice versa. The coupling between polarization and strain gradients is another electromechanical phenomenon, which can be observed by bending a material. This is known as flexoelectricity, which is present in a much wider variety of materials, including non-polar dielectrics and polymers, but is only significant at small length-scales, where high strain-gradients develop. In two dimensional (2D) materials, where large strain gradients are possible, these effects are expected to be strongly enhanced. Besides, the superior elastic properties and reduced lattice symmetry makes 2D materials promising for flexoelectricity. In this proposal, by using state of the art ab initio approaches, fundamental flexoelectric properties of a wide variety of 2D materials will be investigated. Subsequently, a multiscale modeling framework that captures the influence of internal-strain gradients on the electronic and optical properties will be developed. The work proposed here will not only provide a fundamental understanding of flexoelectricity in 2D materials but will also guide the discovery of new flexible electronics.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Bringing nanoscience from the lab to society (NANOLAB). 01/01/2020 - 31/12/2025

Abstract

Nanomaterials play a key role in modern technology and society, because of their unique physical and chemical characteristics. The synthesis of nanomaterials is maturing but surprisingly little is known about the exact roles that different experimental parameters have in tuning their final properties. It is hereby of crucial importance to understand the connection between these properties and the (three-dimensional) structure or composition of nanomaterials. The proposed consortium will focus on the design and use of nanomaterials in fields as diverse as plasmonics, electrosensing, nanomagnetism and in applications such as art conservation, environment and sustainable energy. In all of these studies, the consortium will integrate (3D) quantitative transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy with density functional calculations of the structural stability and optoelectronic properties as well as with accelerated molecular dynamics for chemical reactivity. The major challenge will be to link the different time and length scales of the complementary techniques in order to arrive at a complete understanding of the structure-functionality correlation. Through such knowledge, the design of nanostructures with desired functionalities and the incorporation of such structures in actual applications, such as e.g. highly selective sensing and air purification will become feasible. In addition, the techno-economic and environmental performance will be assessed to support the further development of those applications. Since the ultimate aim of this interdisciplinary consortium is to contribute to the societal impact of nanotechnology, the NanoLab will go beyond the study of simplified test materials and will focus on nanostructures for real-life, cost-effective and environmentally-friendly applications.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Ionic transport and phase transitions in alkali-intercalated two-dimensional materials under active manipulation. 01/11/2019 - 31/10/2023

Abstract

Ionic transport in low-dimensional materials plays the key role in novel concepts of energy harvesting and storage devices. Recent experimental progress allowed fabrication of extremely narrow (comparable to the size of an atom, where quantum effects dominate) and clean channels between 2D materials that are weakly bound together. The flow of ions or molecules is such channels was found to be extremely swift, which was attributed to high pressure induced by such a tight confinement. This pressure also made atoms pack closer together and produce a completely different composite structure by forming bonds with the confining material. The narrowness of the channels allows only a few layers of atoms to move through, in a fashion tunable by applied pressure, lateral strain, or electric field. Once understood, the advanced ionic transport under quantum confinement has potential to boost performance and capacity of batteries. Furthermore, the bonding of ions to the confining material can completely change the electronic phase of the system, so that it becomes e.g. superconducting at low temperatures, and useful for dissipationless electronics. Therefore, the main objective of my project is to investigate the mechanisms of ionic flow in strongly confined channels, how to manipulate ionic ordering and flow therein, and to identify the emergent phase transitions in the systems of interest – to enable novel concepts for blue-energy, miniaturized battery, and nanoelectronics applications

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Dormant chirality in magnetic two-dimensional materials. 01/11/2020 - 31/10/2021

Abstract

It is well known that magnetic exchange interaction drives the behavior of magnetic materials, making them ferromagnetic (positive interaction, spins parallel) or antiferromagnetic (negative interaction, spins antiparallel). It is far less obvious that there exist components of exchange interaction that lead to chiral magnetism, i.e. causing the adjacent spins to assume orthogonal mutual ordering. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) is one such interaction, first identified in the 60's, but it was only the recent observation of skyrmion lattices that instigated its further fundamental research and technological applications. DMI can only arise in systems that lack inversion symmetry and host strong spin-orbit coupling, a condition that is met in few bulk materials, and at interfaces of specifically designed magnetic heterostructures. In 2017, magnetic ordering was also observed in 2D materials, CrI3 being the first. There, magnetic atoms (Cr) are in direct bonding with non-magnetic atoms with strong spin-orbit coupling (I). Therefore DMI must be intrinsically present but is cancelled out in a perfect crystalline lattice so there is no apparent DMI, unless symmetry is broken (at the edges, defects, grain boundaries etc.). What are the microscopic mechanisms to awaken such a dormant DMI, how significant it can be, and how to tailor its release and the corresponding spin textures as a function of temperature and magnetic field, are the overarching themes in this project.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Skyrmionics and magnonics in heterochiral magnetic films – a multiscale approach. 15/07/2020 - 14/07/2021

Abstract

Through this DOCPRO1 project, the PhD student will finalize his thesis on heterochiral magnetic films, based on the just developed generalized Heisenberg methodology on an arbitrary lattice, enabling him to broadly explore the magnetic phase diagram of mono- and bi-layer spin-lattice systems with spatially nonuniform chirality. This study is motivated by recently discovered 2D magnetic materials, their lattice structure, anisotropy, emergent chirality, and geometrical manipulations known to van der Waals engineering. Besides the generic topological characterization and classification of the possible spin textures, attention will be paid to the emergent spin-wave (magnonic) properties in the given spin landscape and novel concepts for spintronic devices.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project website

Transition metal dichalcogenides as unique 2D platform for collective quantum behavior. 01/10/2018 - 30/09/2021

Abstract

Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs) are atomically-thin materials at the forefront of research, owing to their special electronic and optical properties, their tunability by electric gating and mechanical strain, and easy heterostructuring. It is much less explored that they also exhibit a wealth of collective quantum phases, characterized by a collective behavior of the electrons that is entirely different from their individual states. One such phase is a charge density wave, where electrons at lower temperatures form an ordered quantum fluid that restructures the host material. Another low-temperature collective quantum phase in 2D-TMDs is a superconducting one, where electrons condense into a resistance-less sea of Cooper pairs, that carries electric current without dissipation. Furthermore, the spins of the electrons add to the combinatorial possibilities for novel quantum states, and can form textures in monolayer TMDs that are wholly absent in the bulk. All these states are strongly intertwined, but the fundamentals of their interplay are not well understood – which hinders further progress towards novel functionalities and advanced applications. In this project, I will elucidate this interplay using state-of-the-art theoretical tools, and provide a roadmap to tailor it – by e.g. strain, gating and doping – in order to establish 2D-TMDs as a unique platform for highly versatile quantum devices, employing the advantages of all different states at play.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Advanced simulations of topological superconducting hybrids for the second quantum revolution 01/10/2018 - 15/12/2020

Abstract

The European Commission has just launched a €1 billion Flagship-scale initiative in Quantum Technology, within the European H2020 research and innovation framework programme. This initiative aims to place Europe at the forefront of the second quantum revolution, with quantum information, communication and computing at heart, as already unfolding in USA under push by Microsoft and Google. Both latter companies see superconducting hybrid devices as a base for viable quantum technology of the future. This project is aimed at positioning Flanders as a home for realistic theoretical simulations of such devices. At present, numerous experiments around the world are performed on superconducting hybrids with special topological properties, such that they may stabilize exotic Majorana fermions -a quasiparticle obeying non-Abelian statistics, thereby useful for fault-tolerant quantum computing. As no experimental setup is ideally perfect, the convincingly proven signature of the Majorana fermion is still missing. Furthermore, additional aspects appear that are not covered by simplistic models. Therefore, simulations based on realistic parametrizations and geometries are absolutely necessary for improving the theoretical understanding of ongoing experimental efforts, for convincingly confirming the detection and manipulation of Majorana, and to design quantum devices that can reliably replace current technology. The advanced simulations in this project are fully in service of that goal.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Atomically thin superconducting electronics – a multiscale approach. 01/01/2018 - 31/12/2021

Abstract

Superconducting electronics is crucial for a broad spectrum of applications, ranging from highly sensitive biomagnetic measurements of the human body to wideband satellite communications. The ever desired miniaturization and portability of such devices requires the fabrication and behavioral characterization of ultra-small superconducting circuits. Recent advances have enabled controllable growth of crystalline atomically thin (quasi 2D) superconductors, that harbor rich fundamental physics due to quantum confinement of both electrons and phonons, interaction with a substrate, non-trivial effects of strain and gating, etc., and thus hold promise for electronic, magnetic and optical properties that are otherwise unattainable. In other words, ultrathin superconductors can be the base for a new generation of ultra-low power and highly sensitive electronics, with more functionalities than the previous designs. The groundbreaking goal of this project is to enable the exploratory search for those functionalities, by developing multiscale simulations of atomically thin superconducting circuits - starting from ab initio information on electronic and vibronic changes at monolayer thicknesses, then revealing the role of the substrate, intercalants, electric gating, etc. on superconductivity in selected materials, towards simulations of nano-patterned micron-scale circuits, using advanced current-voltage-magnetic field characterization with ab initio parametrization.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Computational design of hetero-chiral magnonics. 01/01/2017 - 31/12/2020

Abstract

Magnetic heterostructures where the chiral interaction is spatially modulated will be investigated to see if they can be used to transport and process magnons. Similarly to photons, magnons are wavelike particles that can propagate through magnetic materials. This could lead to a completely new class of the information processing devices. Our approach will be based on of state-of-the-art numerical micromagnetic simulations on Graphical Processing Units (GPU's).

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Novel electronic properties of atomically-engineered ultra-thin superconducting films and their emerging topological states. 01/10/2015 - 30/09/2018

Abstract

Due to their impact on fundamental physics and possible applications in low-power electronics, superconducting ultra-thin films with thickness ranging from one to a few atomic layers have recently attracted tremendous interest. Their superconducting properties are strongly influenced by the thickness, geometry and structure of the film due to the quantum confinement effects on atomistic scale. Since last years, such ultra-thin films can be grown experimentally, in clean crystalline form, and tuned with atomic precision. Numerous novel electronic properties were observed and even prototype field-effect transistors were realized. However, most of the novel properties are not precisely understood from theoretical standpoint. In this project, we will therefore study the effects of atomic engineering by state-of-the-art Bogoliubov-de Gennes numerical simulations of ultrathin superconductors, with the hope to reveal the impact of atomic edge steps, disorder, and substrate choices on the superconducting condensate and its electronic structure. Emerging new topological states (including vortices, fractional vortices, and skyrmions) will be considered in the presence of magnetic field and electric current. This project will ultimately provide a comprehensive review of possible properties and how to achieve them in scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiments on these fascinating materials.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Superfluidity and superconductivity in multicomponent quantum condensates. 01/01/2015 - 31/12/2018

Abstract

Both superconductors and fermionic superfluids are characterized by frictionless coherent flow, respectively of electron pairs and fermionic atom pairs. Usually, there is only one 'species' of electron pair in a superductor, and analogously only one type of atomic pair in a fermionic superfluid. Recently systems with mixtures of multiple species of pairs have caught the attention of researchers, as it became clear that the interplay of the different types of pairs leads to new behavior that was not expected on the basis of systems with only one type of pair. These systems are called 'multiband' superconductors or superfluids, and in this project we will set up the theoretical tools to model their behavior from the microscopic level up to the level of the macroscopic coherent behavior. With these tools we will systematically investigate how properties (such as critical field and temperature) and important flow patterns (such as vortex matter and solitons) are affected by the multiband nature of the system, and how this multiband nature can be engineered through quantum confinement. Moreover, we seek to characterize new quantum states emerging from the coupling between the different types of pairs.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

(Topological) superconductivity in atomically thin metals 01/10/2014 - 31/10/2016

Abstract

Since the "Graphene Revolution", much progress has been made in fabrication and understanding of one-monolayer-thick two dimensional crystals. Until recently, it was believed superconductivity - the property exhibited by some materials where below a certain temperature, all electrical resistance is lost - could not exist in such systems. When superconductivity was experimentally observed in a monolayer of Pb deposited on a Si substrate, it triggered a debate on the exact origin of this phenomenon. In parallel, tin (Sn), apart from being an elemental superconductor, was found to be a topological insulator in the 2D limit (dubbed "stanene" in analogy to graphene), with ability to conduct electricity perfectly on the edges, while remaining insulating in the interior. This edge superconductivity is extremely robust against impurities or thermal fluctuations, making stanene one of the prime candidates for advanced technological applications. This is the setting in which the proposed research on "topological superconductivity" will take place. We aim to study the behaviour of several different metals in the two dimensional limit: first a single atomic layer, then increasing the number of layers one at a time, and analyze the electronic and phonon spectra using state-of-the-art numerical techniques. This will give access to the topological nature of the electrons, as well as shed light on the reasons of nucleation and pathways of evolution of superconductivity, in a close relationship with available experiments. Given the impact that both superconductivity and topological insulators have had on research so far, the fundamental and technological relevance of this research can hardly be overstated.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Multiscale in Silico Study of Multiband Superconductors. 01/10/2014 - 30/09/2015

Abstract

One Fe-based superconductor that attracted a lot of attention recently is FeSe. The growing evidence suggests that monolayer FeSe superconducts up to 65 K and may become an ideal model system for testing several theoretical ideas [He13,Tan13]. Latter references show the importance of the substrate as a source of strain in the superconducting properties. Intriguingly, monolayer FeSe displays an important feature common to many superconductors: an inflection in the band structure (i.e. small or zero Fermi velocities) at energies that fall within the gap that opens below the critical temperature. This indicates again that a detailed knowledge of the electronic structure is a prerequisite for a successful theory

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Superconductivity per atomic layer. 01/01/2014 - 31/12/2017

Abstract

In this project, we will obtain theoretical insight in the effect of confinement and the choice of the substrate on the superconducting properties of atomistically thin films – by adding one monolayer at the time. Research will be performed via ab initio studies of the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of few‐monolayer films, and the application of Bogoliubov‐de Gennes and Eliashberg formalisms to study the superconducting properties of these films, based on the input from the ab initio calculations.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Superconductivity per atomic layer. 01/10/2013 - 30/09/2014

Abstract

In this project, we want to get theoretical insight in the effect of confinement and the choice of the substrate on the superconducting properties of atomically thin films by adding one monolayer at the time. In this respect, we aim to study elementary superconductors such as Pb and Sn, but also layered chalcogenides (such as NbSe2), and borides (MgB2, OsB2). The latter are particularly important being the most recently discovered (where MgB2 is the highest-temperature conventional (BCS theory) superconductor), while also being two-gap superconductors – where subtle interplay of two coupled Cooper-pair condensates leads to very rich physics.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Numerical experimentation on new superconducting materials. 15/09/2013 - 14/07/2016

Abstract

This project represents a formal research agreement between UA and on the other hand Erasmus Mundus. UA provides Erasmus Mundus research results mentioned in the title of the project under the conditions as stipulated in this contract.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Frustration in Multiband Superconductors. 01/10/2012 - 04/08/2013

Abstract

This project represents a research contract awarded by the University of Antwerp. The supervisor provides the Antwerp University research mentioned in the title of the project under the conditions stipulated by the university.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Exotic sub-mesoscopic superconductors (FWO Vis. Fel., Juha JAYKKA, Finland) 01/03/2012 - 28/02/2013

Abstract

Objectives of the project: - Implementation of EGL theory in simulations. - Extension of EGL theory - Comparison of EGL theory to other phenomenological model.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Vortex matter in type-1.5 superconductors. 01/01/2011 - 31/12/2014

Abstract

The project will investigate experimentally and theoretically the properties of the vortex matter in type-1.5 superconductors and the conditions for the realization of type-1.5 superconductivity in different materials.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Exotic (sub)mesoscopic superconductors. 01/01/2011 - 31/12/2014

Abstract

The main goal of the present project is the theoretical description of nano- and meso-scale phenomena in exotic superconductors, with emphasis on multiband (MB) and noncentrosymmetric (NCS) superconductivity.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Structural characterization and growth modeling of metallic nanowires mediated by biomolecular templates. 01/01/2010 - 31/12/2013

Abstract

The main goal of this project is to understand the formation of metallic nanowires mediated by protein-derived biomolecular templates in such a way that the properties of the fabricated nanowires, including diameter and coverage, become controllable. This goal will be achieved by investigating the effect of different process parameters on the morphology of the nanowires. The structural information which is obtained by TEM and AFM will be combined with the outcome of the modeling studies.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Study of composite superconducting nanowires. 01/10/2009 - 30/09/2012

Abstract

The present project proposes to numerically solve the quantum mechanical mean-field equations describing superconductivity at a microscopic level. We will refine a novel method in order to consider various inhomogeneous situations: presence of impurities, surfaces, interfaces and/or magnetic fields. We will then apply this method to problems of interest related to nanoscale superconductivity.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Nanoscale phenomena in non-centrosymmetric superconductors. 01/07/2009 - 31/12/2013

Abstract

The non-conventional superconductors have been in the very focus of scientific research in the past 20 years. Within this group, a new class ¿ non-centrosymmetric superconductors (NCS) have been discovered in 2005 (e.g. CePt3Si, UIr, CeRhSi3). Those have crystal structure without inversion center(s), and within this project we study the exotic breaking of both spatial and time symmetry of essential superconducting phenomena in mesoscopic NCS samples.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Nanoengineering of layered superconducting systems for controlled THz radiation. 01/01/2009 - 31/12/2011

Abstract

Terahertz (THz) science and technology is highly applicable across all scientific areas. Despite of some realized THz sources, there is still a lack of a concept for a single-chip and controllable THz device. In this project we aim to analyze mechanisms for control of THz radiation in either artificial super-conducting/magnetic multilayers, or high-Tc and ferromagnetic superconductors, using the THz frequency range of Josephson plasma waves and their interaction with magnetic inclusions and applied magnetic field.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Superconductor/ferromagnet hybrids, and spintronics in hybrid materials. 01/10/2008 - 30/09/2018

Abstract

Hybrid nanostructures consisting of a superconducting and a ferromagnetic metallic component, are one of the most interesting study objects, mainly because of their fascinating property to harbor two antitheses in the condensed matter physics - superconductivity and ferromagnetism. At the nanometer scale this combination leads to several important aspects for both fundamental and applied research. The goal is to form a suitable theoretical basis to study such hybrid composites, and further propose their exact realization - as a functional material, with desired electronic and magnetic properties. On the other hand, spintronics is currently a very challenging and rapidly evolving domain within the physics of condensed matter. There one aims to control both the spin and the charge carriers in electronic devices. Spintronic samples intriniscally combine the properties of magnetic and semi-conducting materials, and are therefore supposed to be fast, non-volatile and versatile, and capable of the simultaneous storage and processing of data at a low energy cost.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Project website

Nanostructured semiconductor/magnet/superconductor hybrids. 01/10/2008 - 30/06/2013

Abstract

Novel nanoscale phenomena in nano-engineered artificial semiconductor-magnet-superconductor hybrids will be studied theoretically. Different bi- and multi- component hybrid structures will be investigated, in search of improved functionalities of envisaged superconducting and spintronics devices. The proposed collaboration involves the Condensed Matter Theory group (UA) and the Institute for Theoretical Sciences (University of Notre Dame, USA).

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Nanoengineering of layered superconducting systems for controlled THz radiation. 01/10/2008 - 30/09/2009

Abstract

Terahertz (THz) science and technology is highly applicable across all scientific areas. Despite of some realized THz sources, there is still a lack of a concept for a single-chip and controllable THz device. In this project we aim to analyze mechanisms for control of THz radiation in either artificial super-conducting/magnetic multilayers, or high-Tc and ferromagnetic superconductors, using the THz frequency range of Josephson plasma waves and their interaction with magnetic inclusions and applied magnetic field.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Iterative methods for linear and non-linear Schrodinger equations 01/01/2008 - 31/12/2011

Abstract

The aim of the project is to develop efficient computational methods, based on Krylov space methods, to solve the linear and non-linear Schrödinger equations. This will enable the theoretical methods to move from the approximate 2D models to the more realistic 3D description. The methods will be applied to practical physical problems: to solve the non-linear time-dependent and time-independent Ginzburg-Landau equations for the study of the vortex structure and dynamics in mesoscopic superconductors and to solve the linear Schrödinger equation for realistic self-assembled quantum dots.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Controlled terahertz radiation in layered superconducting systems 01/01/2008 - 31/12/2009

Abstract

Terahertz technology is highly applicable in all scientific areas. Despite of few realized THz sources, there is still a lack of a concept for a controllable THz device. In this project we aim to analyze mechanisms for control of THz radiation in either high-Tc and ferromagnetic superconductors or artificial hybrids, using the THz frequency range of Josephson plasma waves and their interaction with magnetic inclusions and applied magnetic field.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Prize Research Council 2007. 19/12/2007 - 31/12/2007

Abstract

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)

Critical and vortex phenomena in magnetically nano-structured superconductors. 01/03/2006 - 31/12/2007

Abstract

The aim of this project is to investigate a new class of phenomena, based on interaction between ferromagnets (FMs) and superconductors (SCs) when brought together within a nanometer scale. We will study vortex structures of SC/FM hybrids, such as thin SC-films with embedded magnetic nano-clusters, and submicron 3D SC/FM samples. Understanding the physics involved will lead to novel guiding principles for enhancing material and device functionalities.

Researcher(s)

Research team(s)